Thursday, January 19, 2017

Thursday, January 19, 2017 — DT 28261

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28261
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Wednesday, October 2, 2016
Setter
Jay (Jeremy Mutch)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28261]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
KiwiColin
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
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└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

The run of easy workouts continues with this offering from Jay.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

1a   Mutual // respect's beginning with police car going off (10)


6a   Stone // circle left on peak, oddly (4)

The wordplay parses as O ([letter shaped like a] circle) + {L (left) following (on; in an across clue) PA (peak oddly; the first and third [odd] letters of PeAk}

"on" = following (convention for charade indicator) (show explanation )

"A on B" Convention
A sometimes ignored cryptic crossword convention provides that, in an across clue, the construction "A on B" is used to clue B + A.

The rationale for this practice is that in order for A to be placed on B, B must already exist (i.e., already have been written). Since the English language is written from left to right, this means that B must come first and A is then appended to it. .

Notwithstanding the above, a solver must always be vigilant for setters who flout this convention.

hide explanation

9a   Criminal // pair one found in sect (7)

10a   Incapable of supporting oneself? (7)

12a   Viewer keen to see what's in store (6-7)

14a   Go and cover /for/ person switching sides (8)

15a   Digs // suit (6)

17a   A person elected by vicar /to/ refurbish (6)

"person elected" = MP (show explanation )

In Britain (as in Canada), a politician elected to the House of Commons is known as a Member of Parliament[10] (abbreviation MP[5]) or, informally, as a member[5].

hide explanation

"vicar" = REV (show explanation )

A vicar[5] is a member of the clergy, although the meaning of the term varies among religious denominations. The term may mean:
  • in the the Church of England, an incumbent of a parish where tithes formerly passed to a chapter or religious house or layman;
  • in other Anglican Churches, a member of the clergy deputizing for another;
  • in the Roman Catholic Church, a representative or deputy of a bishop;
  • in the US Episcopal Church, a clergyman in charge of a chapel;
  • a cleric or choir member appointed to sing certain parts of a cathedral service.
hide explanation

19a   Criminal // only disheartened with condition attached by judge initially (8)

21a   Limp /and/ miss a platform -- I must go to California shortly (13)

24a   Hurry back and watch Kirov's last // dancer (7)

Rudolf Nureyev[5] (1939–1993) was a Russian-born ballet dancer and choreographer. He defected to the West in 1961, joining the Royal Ballet in London, where he began his noted partnership with Margot Fonteyn. He became a naturalized Austrian citizen in 1982.

Scratching the Surface
The Mariinsky Ballet[7] is the resident classical ballet company of the Mariinsky Theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Founded in the 18th century and originally known as the Imperial Russian Ballet, the Mariinsky Ballet is one of the world's leading ballet companies. Internationally, the Mariinsky Ballet continues to be known by its former Soviet name the Kirov Ballet. The Mariinsky Ballet is the parent company of the Vaganova Ballet Academy, a leading international ballet school.

25a   Gently boil outside with // fish, for example (7)

26a   A measure of whisky enjoyed /in/ Scottish island (4)

Skye[5] is a mountainous island of the Inner Hebrides, now linked to the west coast of Scotland by a bridge; chief town, Portree. It is the largest and most northerly island of the group.

27a   Very popular, /and/ completely sane, drinking a gallon (3,3,4)

Down

1d   Loaded, /but/ ridiculous (4)

2d   State of tension /seeing/ coward struggling across line (4,3)

3d   Maybe mum's got people with her // controlling organisation (6,7)

I would explain the wordplay a bit differently than KiwiColin does on Big Dave's Crossword Blog. I see the wordplay parsing as PARENT (maybe mum) + ([ha]s got) COMPANY (people with her).

4d   Exotic oil on tap, // available as choice (8)

5d   A season up /in/ the hills of Africa (5)

The Atlas Mountains[5] are a range of mountains in North Africa extending from Morocco to Tunisia in a series of chains.

7d   Parking on grass to get around parking twice, // got ready (7)

8d   Desperate attempt // to survive holiday centre (4,6)

As we saw only yesterday, the British use the word holiday(s) where North Americans might say vacation[5].  (show explanation )

Holiday[5,10] (often holidays) is a chiefly British term for a period in which a break is taken from work or studies for rest, travel, or recreation (i) I spent my summer holidays on a farm; (ii) Fred was on holiday in Spain.

According to the British dictionaries, the usual US and Canadian term for such a break is vacation. However, I am accustomed to hearing the two terms used almost interchangeably — in much the same manner as fall and autumn. This may not be the case in all parts of Canada, but I grew up in the Maritimes and have lived in Eastern Ontario for most of my life, both areas where British influence is particularly strong.

In Britain, the word vacation[5] has a very specific meaning, a fixed holiday period between terms in universities and law courts ⇒ the Easter vacation. In North America, such a period might be called a break[7].

hide explanation

11d   Doctors // ring needing custom (5,8)

A group practice[5] is a medical practice run by several doctors.

13d   Plots // Conservative approach in the case of schools (10)

"Conservative" = TORY (show explanation )

The abbreviation for Conservative may be either C.[10] or Con.[10].

A Tory[10] is a member or supporter of the Conservative Party in Great Britain or Canada.

Historically, a Tory[10] was a member of the English political party that opposed the exclusion of James, Duke of York from the royal succession (1679–80). Tory remained the label for subsequent major conservative interests until they gave birth to the Conservative Party in the 1830s.

The Conservative Party[5] is a a major British political party that emerged from the old Tory Party under Sir Robert Peel in the 1830s and 1840s. Since the Second World War, it has been in power 1951–64, 1970-74, and 1979–97. It governed in a coalition with the Liberal Democrats from 2010 until the general election of May 2015, in which it was returned with a majority.

hide explanation

16d   Look after property /in/ strike about old customs (5-3)

18d   Governor/'s/ frailty, getting broody regularly (7)

A viceroy[5] is a ruler exercising authority in a colony on behalf of a sovereign.

20d   Predicament // laid out over English military award (7)

In the UK and Commonwealth countries, the Military Medal[5] (abbreviation MM) is a decoration for distinguished active service on land, instituted in 1916 (originally for enlisted soldiers).

22d   Incus // discovered in Roman villa (5)

The incus[5] (also called anvil[5]) is a small anvil-shaped bone in the middle ear, transmitting vibrations between the malleus and stapes.

23d   Couple lacking source of cash /for/ bank of Scotland (4)

Brae[5] is Scottish for a steep bank or hillside.
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 — DT 28260

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28260
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28260]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Mr Kitty
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
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Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
The National Post has skipped DT 28256 through DT 28259 which were published in The Daily Telegraph from Thursday, October 27, 2016 to Monday, October 31, 2016.

Introduction

A new blogger makes his appearance on Big Dave's Crossword Blog today. Mr Kitty is the husband of regular commenter and sometime blogger, Kitty.

The puzzle was certainly not overly difficult but I did have to call on my electronic reinforcements for help on one clue.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

7a   Joyous // experience lying back with seabird endlessly crossing (7)

8a   Figure // over hundred with name attached? (7)

"over" = O (show explanation )

On cricket scorecards, the abbreviation O[5] denotes over(s), an over[5] being a division of play consisting of a sequence of six balls bowled by a bowler from one end of the pitch, after which another bowler takes over from the other end.

hide explanation

10a   Point of story I found in pub // regarding men's movement? (10)

Local[5] is an informal British term for a pub convenient to a person’s home ⇒ a pint in the local.

Logistics[5] — for the purposes of this clue — is the activity of organizing the movement, equipment, and accommodation of troops.

11a   Club // that's used in a decreasing way (4)

This is a double definition in which the second definition is cryptic. The word "decreasing" is used in a whimsical sense meaning to remove creases from. We are looking for [something] that's used to remove creases from one's shirt, for example.

12a   Pass large recess /in/ ruin (8)

A col[5] is the lowest point of a ridge or saddle between two peaks, typically providing a pass from one side of a mountain range to another.

14a   Neighbour/'s/ pupil away from home, we hear (6)

15a   Replacement of landing in Sussex town // characterising close co-operation (4,2,5)

Diverging from what is shown in Mr Kitty's review, I would include the word "characterising" in the definition.

19a   Placate // inspectors accompanied by a Marine (6)

"inspector" = DI (show explanation )

A detective inspector (DI[5]) is a senior police officer in the UK. Within the British police, inspector[7] is the second supervisory rank. It is senior to that of sergeant, but junior to that of chief inspector. Plain-clothes detective inspectors are equal in rank to their uniformed counterparts, the prefix 'detective' identifying them as having been trained in criminal investigation and being part of or attached to their force's Criminal Investigation Department (CID).

hide explanation

"Marine" = RM (show explanation )

The Royal Marines[5] (abbreviation RM)[5] is a British armed service (part of the Royal Navy) founded in 1664, trained for service at sea, or on land under specific circumstances.

hide explanation

20a   Separate // summary (8)

22a   Worry // where guitarist places his hand? (4)

23a   Peculiar talent in EU // officer (10)

25a   See number mobbing vehicle /in/ Swiss resort (7)

"see" = LO (show explanation )

Lo[5] is an archaic exclamation used to draw attention to an interesting or amazing event and lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them.

hide explanation

Locarno[5] is a resort in southern Switzerland, at the northern end of Lake Maggiore; population 14,909 (2007).

26a   Comic actor entertaining journalist /is/ holiday host (7)

Holiday here has nothing to do with the recently observed Christmas and New Year's.

The British use the word holiday(s) where North Americans might say vacation[5].

Delving Deeper
Holiday[5,10] (often holidays) is a chiefly British term for a period in which a break is taken from work or studies for rest, travel, or recreation (i) I spent my summer holidays on a farm; (ii) Fred was on holiday in Spain.

According to the British dictionaries, the usual US and Canadian term for such a break is vacation. However, I am accustomed to hearing the two terms used almost interchangeably — in much the same manner as the terms fall and autumn are used in Canada. This may not be the case in all parts of Canada, but I grew up in the Maritimes and have lived in Eastern Ontario for most of my life, both areas where British influence is particularly strong.

In Britain, the word vacation[5] has a very specific meaning, a fixed holiday period between terms in universities and law courts ⇒ the Easter vacation. In North America, such a period might be called a break[7].

Redcoat[5] is a British term for an organizer and entertainer at a Butlin's holiday camp*.

Butlins[7] (also Butlin's) is a chain of large holiday camps* in the United Kingdom.

* Holiday camp[5] is a British term for a site for holidaymakers [vacationers] with accommodation, entertainment, and leisure facilities.

Down

1d   A Liberal attempt to limit company /producing/ intoxicating drink (7)

"Liberal" = L (show explanation )

The Liberal Party[5] (abbreviation Lib.[5] or L[2])* in Britain emerged in the 1860s from the old Whig Party and until the First World War was one of the two major parties in Britain. In 1988 the party regrouped with elements of the Social Democratic Party to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, now known as the Liberal Democrats. However, a small Liberal Party still exists although it has no representation in the UK Parliament, no Members of the European Parliament (MEP), no members of the Scottish Parliament, nor any members of the National Assembly for Wales.[7]

Although Lib.[5] may be the more common abbreviation for the Liberal Party in Britain—likely to distinguish it from the the Labour Party[5] (abbreviation Lab.[5])—Chambers 21st Century Dictionary indicates that L[2] may also be used.

hide explanation

Alcopop[5] is an informal British term for a ready-mixed drink that resembles a soft drink but contains alcohol. In Canada, such a beverage is known as a cooler[7].

2d   Food outlet // in grandstand eliminated (4)

3d   Disruption /with/ statue overturned? (4-2)

Bust-up[5] is an informal British term for:
  1. a serious quarrel the diplomatic bust-up with Germany;
  2. a fight or brawl a touchline bust-up.
4d   Local bee could provide // notice of environmental impact (3-5)

Eco-labelling[5] is the practice of marking products with a distinctive label (an eco-label) so that consumers know that their manufacture conforms to recognized environmental standards the launch of a nationwide eco-labelling scheme.

5d   One whose business originates from rank? (4,6)

Rank[5] (short for taxi rank[5]) is a British term* for a place where taxis park while waiting to be hired.

* the equivalent North American term is taxi stand

Behind the Picture
Mr Kitty illustrates his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog with a photo of Robert De Niro, as Travis Bickle, in the 1976 American film Taxi Driver[7].

6d   Gracious individual getting time /in/ ornamental headwear (7)

Cor[5] is an informal British exclamation expressing surprise, excitement, admiration, or alarm ⇒ Cor! That‘s a beautiful black eye you’ve got!.

A coronet[5] is a small or relatively simple crown, especially as worn by lesser royalty and peers or peeresses.

9d   Vets rave about // computer image (6-5)

13d   Corrupt // deal could be the outcome of this? (4,6)

The wordplay in this clue is a reverse anagram (show explanation ). The solution (LEAD ASTRAY) can be viewed as an anagram (ASTRAY) of LEAD producing the result (or "outcome") "deal" which appears in the clue.

In a 'normal' clue, the wordplay appears in the clue and the result arising from the execution of the wordplay is found in the solution. For instance, in a clue of the anagram type, the anagram indicator (operator) and anagram fodder (the material on which the indicator operates) would appear in the clue and the result of performing the anagram operation would be found in the solution.

On the other hand, in a 'reverse anagram', this situation is reversed. The anagram indicator and fodder are found in the solution and the result of executing the anagram operation appears in the clue. This is not unlike the premise of the TV game show Jeopardy — where contestants are given the answer and must respond with a question. Here the solver is given the result of the anagram operation and must find the anagram indicator and fodder which would produce it.

Personally, I would much prefer to use the term 'inverse anagram' rather than 'reverse anagram' as this type of construct is analogous to the concept of inverse functions in mathematics. However, I realize that my point of view is unlikely to find traction.

hide explanation

16d   Illegally getting rid of items -- around 50 - - /to get/ some dough? (8)

17d   Clown /that shows/ seaside venue's decline? (7)

Pierrot[5] is a stock male character in French pantomime, with a sad white-painted face, a loose white costume, and a pointed hat.

18d   Examine US prosecutor left /in/ disgrace (7)

In the US, a district attorney[5] (abbreviation DA) is a public official who acts as prosecutor for the state in a particular district.

21d   Elements of tennis and golf /in/ part of suite (6)

In tennis, darts, and other games, a set[5] is a group of games counting as a unit towards a match ⇒ he took the first set 6-3.

24d   Prison // lift (4)

The nick[5] is an informal British term for prison ⇒ he’ll end up in the nick for the rest of his life.

Nick[5] is an informal British term meaning to steal ⇒ she nicked fivers from the till.
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Tuesday, January 17, 2017 — DT 28255

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28255
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Setter
Jay (Jeremy Mutch)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28255]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
2Kiwis
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
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└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

I did not find the workout to be overly strenuous today.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

1a   New Australian jumper, /and/ one from the 1940s (4,6)

Boomer[5] is an informal Australian term for a large male kangaroo.

While the wordplay works to some extent as a charade of BABY (new) + BOOMER (Australian jumper), it is far more effective as a cryptic definition in which a "new Australian jumper" is a 'BABY BOOMER'.

6a   Miss a // festive occasion (4)

9a   All the best // gold rings perish (5)

The symbol for the chemical element gold is Au[5] (from Latin aurum).

10a   Gradually supplies // wimps welcoming sustenance (4-5)

The word "drip" would appear to carry a different connotation in Britain than in North America. In Britain, drip[5] is an informal term for a weak and ineffectual person whereas, in North America, a drip[3] is a tiresome or annoying person.

12a   Girl Guides /that could be/ stars of stage and screen? (7,6)

I would say that the first part of the clue (marked with a dotted underline) is a cryptic definition making the clue a double definition of a sort.

14a   Outrage after objective /is/ put at risk (8)

15a   Help out with game, oddly /showing/ self-possession (6)

Self-possession[5] is the state or feeling of being calm, confident, and in control of one's feelings; in other words, composure ⇒ an air of self-possession.

Phlegm*[5] denotes calmness of temperament ⇒ phlegm and determination carried them through many difficult situations.

* In medieval science and medicine, phlegm[5] was one of the four bodily humours, believed to be associated with a calm, stolid, or apathetic temperament.

17a   Flinch /from/ engineers with wind (6)

"engineers" = RE (show explanation )

The Corps of Royal Engineers[7], usually just called the Royal Engineers (abbreviation RE), and commonly known as the Sappers[7], is a corps of the British Army that provides military engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces.

hide explanation

19a   Prisoner found outside pub in the morning, // kind of brown (8)

21a   Drastic pay cut helps the Queen /to get/ stand-in tutor (6,7)

"the Queen" = ER (show explanation )

The regnal ciphers (monograms) of British monarchs are initials formed from the Latin version of their first name followed by either Rex or Regina (Latin for king or queen, respectively). Thus, the regnal cipher of Queen Elizabeth is ER[5] — from the Latin Elizabetha Regina.

hide explanation

24a   Simple task /for/ head coach sacking leader (2-7)

25a   Excellent // brief (5)

26a   Slough /is/ building for storage (4)

Scratching the Surface
I am unable to find any possible sense of the word "slough" that produces a meaningful surface reading.

27a   Flower // youth plans to develop (10)

The polyanthus[5] is a herbaceous flowering plant which is a complex hybrid between the wild primrose and primulas, cultivated in Europe since the 17th century.

Down

1d   Endless free-for-all /is/ fine in Glasgow (4)

Braw[5] is a Scottish word meaning fine, good, or pleasing ⇒ it was a braw day.

2d   Got indignant -- // 'Born Free' was the first (7)

Scratching the Surface
Born Free (1960) is the first in a series of three books written by naturalist Joy Adamson (1910–1980) which relate the story of Elsa the lioness[7] and her cubs, Elsa being an orphaned lioness cub that Joy Adamson and her husband, wildlife conservationist and game warden George Adamson (1906–1989), had raised and later released into the wild.

* the sequels are titled Living Free (1961) and Forever Free (1962)

3d   Shrub // that could yield a viable gun oil (13)

Bougainvillea[5] (also bougainvillaea) is an ornamental shrubby climbing plant that is widely cultivated in the tropics. The insignificant flowers are surrounded by large, brightly coloured papery bracts which persist on the plant for a long time.

4d   Men condescended to be heard, /getting/ admitted to church (8)

"men" = OR (show explanation )

In the British armed forces, the term other ranks[5] (abbreviation OR[5]) refers to all those who are not commissioned officers.

hide explanation

5d   Contemplating // a share of money in general (5)

7d   Fish /and/ beer with girl who's married (7)

An alewife*[5] is a northwestern Atlantic fish of the herring family that swims up rivers to spawn.

* The name comes from an old sense of the word "alewife" meaning ‘woman who keeps an ale house’, with reference to the fish's large belly. Having grown up in Nova Scotia, I know this fish as a gaspereau[5].

8d   Masses sent millions to drop // appraisal (10)

11d   Ephemeral success // that's seen with a crepe suzette? (5,2,3,3)

The 2Kiwis have not identified it as such, but I think one could consider this clue to be a double definition.

A crêpe Suzette[5] is a thin dessert pancake flamed and served in alcohol.

13d   Acts for // theatre with grudges (10)

Rep[5] is an informal shortened form of repertory[5]. It can refer either to the performance of various plays, operas, or ballets by a company at regular short intervals,  or to a repertory theatre or company.

16d   Shambles /as/ police inspector arrives, going inside perhaps (8)

"police inspector" = DI (show explanation )

A detective inspector (DI[5]) is a senior police officer in the UK. Within the British police, inspector[7] is the second supervisory rank. It is senior to that of sergeant, but junior to that of chief inspector. Plain-clothes detective inspectors are equal in rank to their uniformed counterparts, the prefix 'detective' identifying them as having been trained in criminal investigation and being part of or attached to their force's Criminal Investigation Department (CID).

hide explanation

18d   First couple of pairs in line /must be/ competent (7)

20d   Rome's worried about one hotel /becoming/ addictive (7)

Moreish[5] is an informal British term meaning so pleasant to eat that one wants more ⇒ a moreish aubergine dip.

22d   Dance // beat gets green light (5)

23d   View reversed after female // charges (4)
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Monday, January 16, 2017

Monday, January 16, 2017 — DT 28254

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28254
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Tuesday, October 25, 2016
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28254]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Miffypops
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
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Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
The National Post has skipped DT 28252 and DT 28253 which were published in The Daily Telegraph on Saturday, October 22, 2016 and Monday, October 24, 2016.

Introduction

Although it is Monday here, we start the week off with a gentle offering from one of the mystery "Tuesday" setters.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

8a   Plain glass /in/ American wagon (7,8)

A schooner is a drinking glass on both sides of the pond. However, in Britain a schooner[5] is a glass for drinking a large measure of sherry, whereas in North American — as well as Australia and New Zealand — the term denotes a tall beer glass.

9a   For every // forward, time must run out (3)

10a   I am no tall fizzy party // drink (11)

Despite being unfamiliar with the tipple, I managed to guess the correct order of the letters in the anagram.

Amontillado[5] is a medium dry sherry whose name comes from Montilla, the name of a town in southern Spain where the original wine was produced.

11a   Compass /showing/ north in storm (5)

12a   Like small talk, perhaps? // Phoney does, truly (9)

15a   Wise crossing America /in/ a banger? (7)

Banger[5] is an informal British term for a sausage ⇒ bangers and mash [mashed potatoes].

Scratching the Surface
The surface reading may be an allusion to British comedian Ernie Wise*.

* The British comic duo Morecambe and Wise[7] (also known as Eric and Ernie), comprised of Eric Morecambe (1926-1984) and Ernie Wise (1925–1999), were a British comic double act, working in variety, radio, film and most successfully in television. Their partnership lasted from 1941 until Morecambe's death in 1984. They have been described as "the most illustrious, and the best-loved, double-act that Britain has ever produced".

Banger[5] is an informal British term for an old car in poor condition ⇒ they’ve only got an old banger.

17a   Dreary broadcast about tail of urban // fox (7)

Reynard[5,10] is a literary name for a fox, found in medieval tales, fables, etc.

19a   A leading lady in the cinema? (9)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops describes the solution as The lady with the torch who leads you to your seat at the cinema.
No, she is not carrying a flaming brand. Torch[10] is the British name for a flashlight.

20a   Singer, for example, // appearing in Pisa (a cappella) (5)

Isaac Merrit Singer[5] (1811–1875) was an American inventor who, in 1851, designed and built the first commercially successful sewing machine.

21a   Weepy // guys seen parting in latest shot (11)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops equates the word "guys" to chaps, blokes or males.
Chap[3,4,11] and bloke[5] are both informal British terms for a man — although ones that should be well within the ken of most North Americans.

24a   Wife English duke // married (3)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops describes the solution as The initial letters of the first three words. Why? I do not know. It just is.
This is likely just Miffypops being playful. If not, the answer is that the initial letters of the first three words of the clue are also well-known abbreviations for those words.

"duke" = D (show explanation )

A duke[5] (abbreviation D.[10]) is a male holding the highest hereditary title in the British and certain other peerages*.

* The peerage[5] is the nobility in Britain or Ireland, comprising the ranks of duke or duchess, marquess or marchioness, earl or countess, viscount or viscountess, and baron or baroness.

hide explanation

25a   Unsurpassed // wit -- foster-father cracks up (2,3,5,5)

The phrase of the first water[5] (said of a diamond or pearl) denotes of the greatest brilliance and transparency ⇒ a gem of the first water.

The phrase is also used to refer to a person or thing that is unsurpassed of their kind, typically in an undesirable way ⇒ she was a bore of the first water.

Down

1d   Plenty required to support carnival? // I agree (4,6)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops writes of a carnival with merry-go-rounds and helter-skelters.
Helter-skelter[5] is a British term for a fairground amusement consisting of a tall spiral slide winding around a tower.

2d   Sophisticated // city, Estonia's capital (6)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops writes This word meaning in relating to or characteristic of a city appeared at 15d in yesterday’s puzzle.
He is referring to DT 28253 which is the second of the two puzzles which the National Post skipped today. Having solved that puzzle immediately before tackling this one, I saw the answer to this clue almost instantly.

3d   Back to win against // silver medallist (6,4)

4d   Improvised singing /from/ jazz enthusiast following Shaw's intro? (4)

Cat[5] is an informal North American term (especially among jazz enthusiasts) for a man ⇒ (i) this West Coast cat had managed him since the early 80s; (ii) the cat went crazy on the horn.

Scat[5] is improvised jazz singing in which the voice is used in imitation of an instrument.

Scratching the Surface
Artie Shaw[7] (1910–2004), born Arthur Jacob Arshawsky, was an American clarinetist, composer, bandleader, and actor. Also an author, Shaw wrote both fiction and non-fiction.

Widely regarded as "one of jazz's finest clarinetists", Shaw led one of the United States' most popular big bands in the late 1930s through the early 1940s. Though he had numerous hit records, he was perhaps best known for his 1938 recording of Cole Porter's "Begin the Beguine" which became one of the era's defining recordings.

5d   Treacherous conduct /in/ revolting dramatic work (4,4)

6d   Woman /appearing in/ upcoming article after article (4)

7d   Religious building /in/ earlier year (6)

A priory[5] is a small monastery or nunnery that is governed by a prior or prioress.

8d   Pays up for recycling, putting in right // kind of paper (7)

13d   Cover tax // trial in Hollywood? (6,4)

14d   Equal to // duck and Thai prawn mixture? (2,1,3,4)

"duck" = O (show explanation )

In cricket, a duck[5] is a batsman’s score of nought [zero] ⇒ he was out for a duck. This is similar to the North American expression goose egg[5] meaning a zero score in a game.

In British puzzles, "duck" is used to indicate the letter "O" based on the resemblance of the digit "0" to this letter.

hide explanation

16d   Rows follow broadcast /showing/ companies with sky-high charges (8)

I take charge[5] to mean a person or thing entrusted to the care of someone ⇒ the babysitter watched over her charges. Thus the "sky-high charges" are the companies' customers. Of course, one may also choose to read a different meaning into the clue.

18d   Drink after Edward's put over // point that settles things (7)

A decider[5] is a game, goal, point, etc. that settles a contest or series of contests.

19d   Result /of/ increased dose (6)

The word "of" is used as a link word between the definition and wordplay. (show explanation )

When used in this way, "of" denotes that the solution is formed from the constituent parts derived from the wordplay.

This is based on the word of[5] being used as a preposition indicating the material or substance constituting something ⇒ (i) the house was built of bricks; (ii) walls of stone.

hide explanation

20d   Relatives // legally separated, initially (2-4)

22d   Pay attention to // short statement (4)

23d   Long story // from chimney-sweep I contacted (4)
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon