Saturday, June 25, 2016

Saturday, June 25, 2016 — Cox & Rathvon (Preliminary Post)

Introduction

Here is today's puzzle from Cox & Rathvon. I will return later with the solution.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for the moment — Falcon

Friday, June 24, 2016

Friday, June 24, 2016 — DT 28050

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28050
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28050]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Gazza
BD Rating
Difficulty - Enjoyment - ★★
Falcon's Experience
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Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
The National Post has skipped DT 28047 through DT 28049 which were published in The Daily Telegraph from Friday, February 26, 2016 to Monday, February 29, 2016.

Introduction

The editor's at the National Post once again show off their athletic prowess by leaping over three puzzles.

Today's puzzle from one of the mystery 'Tuesday' setters should not keep you from getting on with your other plans for the day.

Best wishes to readers from Québec who today celebrate the Fête nationale du Québec — getting into the party mood a week ahead of the rest of us.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

1a   Sees term out, // academic term (8)

5a   Criminal // gang, Italian (6)

"Italian" = IT (show explanation )

This clueing might be explained in either of the following ways:
  • It.[10] is an abbreviation for Italian or Italy.

  • Italian[10] is another name for Italian vermouth. It[5] is an informal, dated British term for Italian vermouth ⇒ he poured a gin and it.
hide explanation

9a   Watchful // attendant behind old boy (9)

"old boy" = OB (show explanation )

In Britain, an old boy[5] (abbreviation OB[2])  is:
  1. a former male student of a school or college ⇒an old boy of Banbury County School; or
  2. a former male member of a sports team or company ⇒ the White Hart Lane old boy squared the ball to present an easy chance from 12 yards.
It is also a chiefly British affectionate form of address to a boy or man ⇒ ‘Look here, old boy,’ he said.

hide explanation

11a   Slightly reduced, modest // object (5)

12a   Page one -- vulgar // infringement of copyright (6)

13a   One feeding ruminants, back // together again following separation (8)

The wordplay — which it took seemingly forever to see — parses as UNIT (one) contained in (feeding) a reversal (back) of DEER (ruminants).

15a   Wild rose experts /in/ train (6,7)

This clue could well be a salute to our friends in Alberta — although I doubt that was the intention of the setter.

The Orient Express[5] was a train which ran between Paris and Istanbul and other Balkan cities, via Vienna, from 1883 to 1961. Since 1961 the name has been used for various trains running over parts of the old route.

18a   Accept a less important role /and/ shock bench, perhaps (4,1,4,4)

22a   Choice, but no starter // choice (8)

23a   Odd story about eastern // shellfish (6)

26a   Male in band /gets/ break (5)

27a   Absolve // former partner facing single charge (9)

28a   Latin ruler capturing island /brings/ pleasure (6)

29a   Nurse bringing in coffee /for/ slovenly woman (8)

State Registered Nurse[10] (abbreviation SRN) was was a designation formerly used in Britain for a nurse who had extensive training and passed examinations enabling him or her to perform all nursing services. It would appear that this designation has now been replaced by the term Registered General Nurse[10] (abbreviation RGN).

Down

1d   Venomous creature /in/ house? Any number (8)

In astrology, Scorpio[10] (also called the Scorpion) is the eighth sign of the zodiac, symbol , having a fixed water classification and ruled by the planet Mars and the dwarf planet Pluto. The sun is in this sign between about Oct 23 and Nov 21.

The letter n[10] is used (especially in mathematics) as a symbol to represent an indefinite number (of) ⇒ there are n objects in a box.

2d   Stingy hoarder /may cause/ endless grief (5)

3d   Arab /in/ rush to be admitted to hospital (7)

San[5] is an informal term for what is known in Britain as a sanatorium[5] and in the US as a sanitarium[5]. Although Oxford Dictionaries characterizes the latter term as 'North American', it might more accurately be described as a US term as there are numerous examples of sanatoriums (or sanatoria) in Canada.

4d   Some ordered a mozzarella // cheese (4)

Edam[5] is a round Dutch cheese, typically pale yellow with a red wax coating.

Scratching the Surface
Mozzarella[5] is a firm white Italian cheese made from buffalo or cow’s milk, used especially in pizzas and salads.

6d   Musical instruction /from/ an eminent Florentine (7)

Dante[5] (1265–1321), full name Dante Alighieri, was an Italian poet. His reputation rests chiefly on The Divine Comedy (circa 1309–20), an epic poem describing his spiritual journey through Hell and Purgatory and finally to Paradise. His love for Beatrice Portinari is described in Vita nuova (circa 1290-4).

Although Dante was born in Florence, he spent the latter part of his life living in forced exile and is buried in Ravenna. Florence eventually came to regret Dante's exile, and the city made repeated requests for the return of his remains. The custodians of the body in Ravenna refused. Nonetheless, a tomb was built for him in Florence in 1829, in the basilica of Santa Croce. That tomb has been empty ever since, with Dante's body remaining in Ravenna, far from the land he had loved so dearly.[7]

In music, andante[5] is an adverb and adjective meaning (especially as a direction) in a moderately slow tempo.

7d   Tea missed abroad? // Small cup of coffee /provided/ (9)

Although it is positioned at the end of the clue, the word "provided" serves essentially the same function as a link word.

8d   Verbal onslaught /from/ one stuck in traffic (6)

10d   He paints eccentric // theatrical type (8)

14d   Much less // left by Greek character, single (3,5)

Eta[5] is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet (Η, η).

16d   Kind heart unfortunately // uninformed (2,3,4)

17d   Ship's doctor eating last of succulent // fish (8)

Why specifically "a ship's doctor"? Because surgeon[10] is the term used for a medical officer in the Royal Navy.

What did he say?
In Comment #21 on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Shropshirelad says it wasn’t a bad puzzle except for the 17d answer. I will say no more as ‘that woman’ makes me seethe.
Nicola Sturgeon[7] is the fifth and current First Minister of Scotland [a position roughly equivalent to that of the Premier of a Canadian province] and the Leader of the Scottish National Party. She is the first woman to hold either position.

19d   Stewed neck, hit /in/ cookhouse (7)

20d   Important bridge player /leaving/ place in Florida (3,4)

Here "leaving" is not a deletion indicator but a link word. The sense of the clue is "Combine words meaning 'important' and 'bridge player' and you are left with the name of a place in Florida".

21d   Furtive type /in/ frame after end of review (6)

24d   Article secured by the // old clan chief (5)

Historically, in Scotland, a thane[5] was a man, often the chief of a clan, who held land from a Scottish king and ranked with an earl’s son.

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Gazza remarks that thane is a word known mainly (at least south of the border [between England and Scotland]) from its use in the Scottish play.
Macbeth[7] (full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. Set mainly in Scotland, the play dramatises the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake.

In the backstage world of theatre, some believe that the play is cursed, and will not mention its title aloud, referring to it instead as "the Scottish play".

25d   Bird, // female bird of prey (4)
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Thursday, June 23, 2016 — DT 28046

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28046
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Thursday, February 25, 2016
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28046]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Shropshirelad
BD Rating
Difficulty - Enjoyment - ★★ / ★★★
Falcon's Experience
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Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

This was a 'Thursday' puzzle in the UK as well but RayT is not on duty today. In his absence, his alternate serves up a rather gentle offering.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

1a   Artist's medium /in/ van, say (7)

In the first definition, vehicle[5] might be used in any of several senses:
  • a thing used to express, embody, or fulfil something ⇒ I use paint as a vehicle for my ideas
  • a substance that facilitates the use of a drug, pigment, or other material mixed with it ⇒ casein was used as a vehicle for pigments by the medieval painters
  • a film, television programme, song, etc. that is intended to display the leading performer to the best advantage ⇒ a vehicle for a star who was one of Hollywood’s hottest properties
5a   Ministry in charge expressed hesitation // a bit (7)

In the UK, the abbreviation MOD[5] stands for Ministry of Defence.

"in charge" = IC (show explanation )

The abbreviation i/c[5] can be short for either
  1. (especially in military contexts) in charge of ⇒ the Quartermaster General is i/c rations; or
  2. in command ⇒ 2 i/c = second in command.
hide explanation

9a   Pursue // hospital in legal matter (5)

10a   Powerful guy // amongst assembled number around Republican (9)

"Republican" = R (show explanation )

A Republican[5] (abbreviation R[5])  is a member or supporter of the Republican Party[5], one of the two main US political parties (the other being the Democratic Party), favouring a right-wing stance, limited central government, and tough, interventionist foreign policy. It was formed in 1854 in support of the anti-slavery movement preceding the Civil War.

In the UK, republican can refer to an advocate of a united Ireland but the abbreviation does not seem to apply in that case.

hide explanation

11a   Reach inlet abroad // without suspicion (2,3,5)

12a   Interpret for audience // quiz answer (4)

The word "parse" (interpret), when pronounced in a non-rhotic (show explanation ) British accent ("pAHse"), supposedly sounds like "PASS" (a stock answer on the British television quiz show Mastermind) — although Big Dave expresses skepticism.

Non-rhotic accents omit the sound < r > in certain situations, while rhotic accents generally pronounce < r > in all contexts. Among the several dozen British English accents which exist, many are non-rhotic while American English (US and Canadian) is mainly rhotic. This is, however, a generalisation, as there are areas of Britain that are rhotic, and areas of America that are non-rhotic. For more information, see this guide to pronouncing < r > in British English.

hide explanation

Delving Deeper
Mastermind[7] is a British quiz show, well known for its challenging questions, intimidating setting and air of seriousness.

Devised by Bill Wright, the basic format of Mastermind has never changed—contestants face two rounds, one on a specialised subject of the contestant's choice, the other a general knowledge round. Wright drew inspiration from his experiences of being interrogated by the Gestapo during World War II.

In each round, the contestant is given a set period of time to answer questions. The questioner reads out a question. If the contestant gives the correct answer, he or she scores one point, and the questioner then reads out the next question. The contestant may pass (by simply saying "pass") if he or she doesn't know the answer, or prefers not to spend time trying to remember the answer: the questioner does not begin to read the next question until the contestant has given an answer or said "pass". If a question is answered incorrectly, the questioner will give the correct answer before reading out the next question; this uses some of the contestant's remaining time. However, if the contestant passes, the questioner moves straight on to the next question: the answer is not read out until the end of the round.

14a   Dog with German entering alone // in amazing fashion (12)

In his review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Shropshirelad has "dog" being a short form for dog tag* which would seem to be a fanciful — if not staggeringly desperate — invention on his part. 
* "dog (not the four-legged variety) that a soldier would wear"
Tag[1] is a verb meaning to dog or follow closely.

18a   Adjustable scale over cover /in/ financial summary (7,5)

Like Shropshirelad, "I’m confused by the term ‘over’ being used [as a charade indicator] on an ‘across’ clue." I suspect the setter may have pulled a previously written clue from his files without checking that it fit the circumstances of this puzzle.

21a   Tense thoroughfare in Paris? /That's/ constant (4)

"tense" = T (show explanation )

Grammatically speaking, t.[10] is the abbreviation for tense.

hide explanation

The French word for 'street' is rue[8].

22a   A result of being dubbed? (10)

25a   Slips etc /in/ foreign articles on Spain amid conflict (9)

In French, the masculine singular form of the indefinite article is un[8] while, in German, der[8] is one of the several forms that the definite article may assume.

"Spain" = E (show explanation )

The International Vehicle Registration (IVR) code for Spain is E[5] [from Spanish España].

hide explanation

26a   Better // barbecue? (5)

27a   Gold found in river // stream (7)

"gold" = OR (show explanation )

Or[5] is gold or yellow, as a heraldic tincture.

hide explanation

The Trent[5] is the chief river of central England, which rises in Staffordshire and flows 275 km (170 miles) generally north-eastwards, uniting with the River Ouse 25 km (15 miles) west of Hull to form the Humber estuary.

28a   Have too much of board? (7)

Down

1d   Two short men, // one suffering a crime? (6)

2d   Toast /in/ sound condition (6)

In his review, Shropshirelad opines that "the latter [definition] reads like it should end with a ‘y’". That is true only because he has included too many words in the definition.

3d   In church, unexpectedly let in men /bringing/ fruit (10)

"church" = CE (show explanation )

The Church of England[10] (abbreviation CE[10]) is the reformed established state Church in England, Catholic in order and basic doctrine, with the Sovereign as its temporal head.

hide explanation

4d   Parade a selfie? It's restricting // support for artist (5)

5d   Thin figure entering boggy area /in/ African city (9)

Marrakesh is an alternate spelling of Marrakech[5], a city in western Morocco, in the foothills of the High Atlas Mountains; population 1,070,838 (2004). It was founded in 1062 as the capital of the Almoravids.

6d   Unpleasantly damp // part of old Ankara (4)

Scratching the Surface
Ankara[5] is the capital of Turkey since 1923; population 3,763,600 (est. 2007). Prominent in Roman times as Ancyra, it later declined in importance until chosen by Kemal Atatürk in 1923 as his seat of government. Former name (until 1930) Angora.

7d   A PC in mag rebooted /for/ operations (8)

8d   Object to view around yard /in/ contemplation (5,3)

13d   Note place for eggs by river -- and singular // soup (10)

In music, mi is an alternate spelling* of me[5], the third note of a major scale in tonic sol-fa.
* Or perhaps it is the other way around. In the US, the name of the note is spelled mi[3,11] while, in the UK, both spellings are in use. Two out of four British dictionaries list me[2,5] as the principal spelling while a third shows mi[10] as being the primary spelling. The fourth, The Chambers Dictionary, defines me[1] as being an anglicized spelling of mi [which I guess may be Italian in origin].
15d   Feature on course before strike /in/ protected area (5,4)

16d   Get in way of // old boy with lorry largely occupying street (8)

"old boy" = OB (show explanation )

In Britain, an old boy[5] (abbreviation OB[2])  is:
  1. a former male student of a school or college ⇒an old boy of Banbury County School; or
  2. a former male member of a sports team or company ⇒ the White Hart Lane old boy squared the ball to present an easy chance from 12 yards.
It is also a chiefly British affectionate form of address to a boy or man ⇒ ‘Look here, old boy,’ he said.

hide explanation

Lorry[5] is the common name in the UK for the vehicle known in North America as a truck[5] — although the word truck also seems to be well known to the Brits. In fact, Oxford Dictionaries rather circularly defines a lorry as being a truck and a truck as being a lorry.

17d   Fish // left in sink (8)

A flounder[5] is any of several species of small flatfish typically found in shallow coastal water.

19d   Calm // soprano with glasses and tenor haggle after vacation (6)

This is known as a 'visual' or 'looks like' clue. The word "glasses" is used to clue OO because this combination of letters looks like a pair of eyeglasses.

"soprano" = S (show explanation )

In music, the abbreviation for soprano is S or s[2].

hide explanation

"tenor"= T (show explanation )

In music, the abbreviation for tenor is T[2].

hide explanation

Here vacation is used as an indication to remove the interior letters of "haggle" leaving only the outer letters "HE". This usage is based on vacation[5] meaning the act of departing from or abandoning [or, in other words, emptying] property, etc.

20d   Skilful // medic probing a round object (6)

23d   Uniform, perhaps, put on old // film star (5)

Greta Garbo[5] (1905–1990) was a Swedish-born American actress; born Greta Gustafsson. She is remembered for films such as Anna Christie (1930), Mata Hari (1931), and Anna Karenina (1935). After her retirement in 1941 she lived as a recluse.

24d   Rupees given in payment -- /or/ no charge (4)

The rupee[5] (abbreviation R[10]) is the basic monetary unit of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Mauritius, and the Seychelles, equal to 100 paise in India, Pakistan, and Nepal, and 100 cents in Sri Lanka, Mauritius, and the Seychelles.
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Wednesday, June 22, 2016 — DT 28045

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28045
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Setter
Jay (Jeremy Mutch)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28045]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
2Kiwis
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
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Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

As always, Jay serves up a very well-crafted and thoroughly enjoyable puzzle. The 2Kiwis give it three stars for difficulty — which is fair enough — but I would definitely place it at the lower end of the three-star range.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

1a   Argue about details /of/ parish list to be circulated (5,5)

6a   Nibbled, accepting a // lure (4)

9a   Lack of sense /in/ position that's open (7)

10a   Plan // to reduce lighting around site of Taj Mahal (7)

The Taj Mahal[5] is a mausoleum at Agra in northern India built by the Mogul emperor Shah Jahan (1592–1666) in memory of his favourite wife, completed circa 1649. Set in formal gardens, the domed building in white marble is reflected in a pool flanked by cypresses.

12a   Aunt Sally/'s/ cattle with a sense of humour (8,5)

Aunt Sally[5] denotes:
  1. a game played in some parts of Britain in which players throw sticks or balls at a wooden dummy;
  2. a dummy used in the game of Aunt Sally; or
  3. [presumably by extension] a person or thing set up as an easy target for criticism ⇒ today’s landowner is everyone’s Aunt Sally.
14a   Everything depend on this // quality attributed to openers (8)

"Quality attributed to openers" could otherwise be expressed as "openers' quality" which parses as KEYS (openers) + TONE (quality).

15a   Mother's back with father in France - // a physicist (6)

The French word for 'father' is père.

André-Marie Ampère[5] (1775–1836) was a French physicist, mathematician, and philosopher, who analysed the relationship between magnetic force and electric current.

17a   Tabloid in credit (almost) - // how sad! (6)

Tick[5] (used in the phrase on tick) is an informal British term meaning credit ⇒ the printer agreed to send the brochures out on tick. The term apparently originates as a short form for ticket in the phrase on the ticket, referring to an IOU or promise to pay.

19a   Perfect order for sweet? (5-3)

Sweet[5] is a British term for a sweet dish forming a course of a meal; in other words, a pudding or dessert.

Contrary to what the 2Kiwis show in their review, I would say that this clue is a cryptic definition rather than a double definition. It cannot be a double definition as the numeration (5-3) is wrong for the dessert, which would be (5,3).

Furthermore, I would say that the definition as merely "perfect" rather than "perfect order". Phrasing the clue in the form of a question allows the setter to concisely express the idea "A type of order that would be perfect for a sweet".

Apple-pie order[5] denotes perfect order or neatness ⇒ everything was in apple-pie order.

21a   Confront a challenge /of/ rotten teeth but be ill (4,3,6)

24a   Person much attracted to another // married drunk (7)

25a   Report /of/ rifles recently pinched (7)

26a   Reverse a touch /to get/ information (4)

27a   Corrupt // guide with a second bearer (4,6)

Down

1d   Unionist thrown out of sophisticated // bar (4)

A Unionist[5] (abbreviation U[10]) is:
  1. A person, especially a member of a Northern Ireland political party, who is in favour of the union of Northern Ireland with Great Britain; or
  2. Historically, a member of a British political party formed in 1886 which supported maintenance of the parliamentary union between Great Britain and Ireland.
2d   Money must keep accountant // in the neighbourhood (7)

Lolly[5] is an informal British term for money ⇒ you’ve done brilliantly raising all that lovely lolly.

The official designation CA[5] for Chartered Accountant is used in Scotland — and was formerly employed in Canada. However, as of January 2013, Canadian CAs — together with CGAs (Certified General Accounts) and CMAs (Certified Management Accountants) have adopted the CPA (Chartered Professional Accountant) designation.


Delving Deeper
Outside Scotland, the term "chartered accountant" is used by members of the accounting profession in the UK who belong to certain professional bodies.

In the UK (apart from Scotland) the designatory letters are ACA[10] (Associate of the Institute of Chartered Accountants) or FCA[10] (Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants). The designatory letters ACA and FCA are also employed in the Republic of Ireland although there I would presume that they stand for Associate of Chartered Accountants Ireland and Fellow of Chartered Accountants Ireland respectively — Chartered Accountants Ireland (CAI) being the Irish counterpart to the Institute of Chartered Accounts in England and Wales (ICAEW) and Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS).[7]

In addition to the organizations already mentioned there are a plethora of other bodies representing accountants in the UK. In fact, in the UK there are no licence requirements for individuals to describe themselves or to practise as accountants. However, those who use the description "chartered accountant" must be members of one of the organisations mentioned above or a recognised equivalent body in another Commonwealth country.

3d   Difficult words to say // ensure twit got confused (6-7)

4d   A night out across the city? // Whatever (8)

Here, "whatever" could be a non-specific response to a request to state a preference 'What would you like to drink?' 'Whatever' .

5d   Gas // attack planned by air (5)

The solution sounds like (by air) RAID ON (attack planned).

Radon[5] (symbol Rn) is the chemical element of atomic number 86, a rare radioactive gas belonging to the noble gas series.

7d   First-class part needed to cover hospital // vent (7)

"first-class" = AI (show explanation )

A1[4][5] or A-one[3] (also A-1) meaning first-class or excellent comes from a classification for ships in The Lloyd's Register of Shipping where it means equipped to the highest standard or first-class.

hide explanation

8d   Perhaps watch // the enemy and respect the Queen (10)

In cryptic crosswords, we often find that time is the enemy, expressed by Irish poet William Butler Yeats as "The innocent and the beautiful have no enemy but time" meaning that innocence and beauty are each subject to the ravages of time.

"the Queen" = ER (show explanation )

The regnal ciphers (monograms) of British monarchs are initials formed from the Latin version of their first name followed by either Rex or Regina (Latin for king or queen, respectively). Thus, the regnal cipher of Queen Elizabeth is ER[5] — from the Latin Elizabetha Regina.

hide explanation

11d   Gathering tall stories about new // areas of production (8,5)

13d   Personal transport /needed to put/ fish on slab? (10)

16d   Scottish league, formerly encouraged, // spent extravagantly (8)

The Scottish Premier League[7] (SPL) was the top level league competition for professional football [soccer] clubs in Scotland. The league was founded in 1998, when it broke away from the Scottish Football League (SFL). It was abolished in 2013, when the SPL and SFL merged to form the new Scottish Professional Football League, with its top division being known as the Scottish Premiership.

18d   Endeavour /shown by/ office worker welcomed by a disheartened typist (7)

20d   Person who might throw // a large vessel (7)

22d   Bottom of the lake /is/ spooky (5)

23d   Check // answer in pen (4)
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Tuesday, June 21, 2016 — DT 28044

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28044
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28044]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Gazza
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★ / ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

Today we are served a rather gentle offering from one of the mystery "Tuesday" setters.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in all-in-one (&lit.) clues, semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//). Definitions presented in blue text are for terms that appear frequently.

Across

1a   Programme includes student's first // multiplication aid (5,5)

6a   Hereditary, in part? // Correct (4)

9a   Mountain-dweller // also described by the old man (5)

The use of the word "describe" as a containment indicator is a common cryptic crossword convention. This device relies on describe[3] being used in the sense of to trace the form or outline of ⇒ describe a circle with a compass. Thus, in today's clue, we have PA (the old man) containing (describing) AND (also) with the rationale for the wordplay being that the container (PA) forms an outline around the contained entity (AND) in a similar manner to the circumference of a circle forming an outline around the circular area contained within it.

The panda[5] (also giant panda) is a large bear-like mammal (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) with characteristic black-and-white markings, native to certain mountain forests in China. It feeds almost entirely on bamboo and has become increasingly rare.

10a   Acts I deny working /for/ cartel (9)

12a   Heard I was hard? // Nonsense (7)

"hard" = H (show explanation )

H[5] is an abbreviation for hard, as used in describing grades of pencil lead ⇒ a 2H pencil.

hide explanation

Eyewash[5] is an informal term for insincere talk or nonsense ⇒ all that stuff about blood being thicker than water was a lot of eyewash. This seems not to be a British expression, as the Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary provides essentially the same definition[11]. However, the American Heritage Dictionary offers a somewhat different connotation, defining eyewash[3] as an informal term for actions or remarks intended to conceal the facts of a situation.

13a   Fear /of/ onset of darkness? Study needed (5)

In Britain, to read[5] means to study (an academic subject) at a university ⇒ (i) I’m reading English at Cambridge; (ii) he went to Manchester to read for a BA in Economics.

15a   Further // loan (7)

16a   Bone // tossed initially into Spanish dish (7)

Paella[5] is a Spanish dish of rice, saffron, chicken, seafood, etc., cooked and served in a large shallow pan.

18a   Noisy celebration /in/ joint's at an end (5-2)

Up[5] is an adjective meaning at an end ⇒ (i) his contract was up in three weeks; (ii) time’s up.

Knees-up[5] is British slang for a lively party or gathering we had a bit of a knees-up last night.

Delving Deeper
"Knees Up Mother Brown"[7] is a song that became popular in English pubs in the early part of the 20th century and was particularly associated with Cockney culture. The expression "knees up" came to mean a party or a dance. The tune has been adopted by football [soccer] fans for various chants. Here it is performed by Noel Harrison and Petula Clark:



20a   Envisage // opponent tackling reserve by end of game (7)

Among other possibilities, res.[2] is the abbreviation for reserve.

21a   Article taken from grubby // relative (5)

23a   Bird -- // I check on unfamiliar sort (7)

"check" = CH (show explanation )

In chess, ch.[10] is the abbreviation for check.

hide explanation

25a   Draughts, perhaps, // made bar go uncomfortable (5,4)

Draughts[10] is the British name for checkers.

26a   Saw // a duke decline (5)

"duke" = D (show explanation )

A duke[5] (abbreviation D.[10]) is a male holding the highest hereditary title in the British and certain other peerages.

hide explanation

27a   Peculiar piano // seat (4)

Rum[5] is a dated informal British term meaning odd or peculiar ⇒ it’s a rum business, certainly.


"piano" = P (show explanation )

Piano[3,5] (abbreviation p[5]), is a musical direction meaning either (as an adjective) soft or quiet or (as an adverb) softly or quietly.

hide explanation

28a   Young landlord enclosing second // bulletin (10)

Let[5] is a chiefly British term meaning to allow someone to have the use of (a room or property) in return for regular payments ⇒ (i) she let the flat [apartment] to a tenant; (ii) they’ve let out their house. [I doubt that this word is quite as British as Oxford Dictionaries would have us believe.[3,11]]

A letter[1] is a person who lets, especially on hire. [Among my stable of dictionaries, this definition is found only in The Chambers Dictionary.]

Down

1d   Record // knock by opener for Essex (4)

Scratching the Surface
The surface reading is all cricket.

In cricket, knock[5] is an informal term for an innings*, especially of an individual batsman ⇒ a splendid knock of 117 against Somerset.
* Innings[5] can mean:
  1. each of two or four divisions of a game during which one side has a turn at batting ⇒ the highlight of the Surrey innings; or
  2. a player’s turn at batting ⇒ he had played his greatest innings; or
  3. (as used in this clue) the score achieved during a player’s turn at batting ⇒ a solid innings of 78 by Marsh.
In cricket, an opener[5] is a batsman who opens the batting [i.e., is the first player to bat].

Essex[5] is a county of southeastern England; county town, Chelmsford. Essex County Cricket Club[7] is one of eighteen first-class* county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales.
* First-class cricket[7] is that which is played at the highest international or domestic standard.

2d   Handle // work of art after staff (9)

3d   Sounds like Arab leader with broken nose -- point /and/ show disbelief (5,4,4)

A sheikh[5] (also shaikh, shaykh, or sheik) is an Arab leader, in particular the chief or head of an Arab tribe, family, or village. The name can be pronounced either shake or sheek.

4d   In question, // investment after a short time (2,5)

5d   Protracted dance, /or/ friendly ball? (4,3)

In cricket, long hop[5] denotes a a short-pitched, easily hit ball ⇒ he fascinated spectators by bowling slow full tosses and deliberate long-hops. [Note that Oxford Dictionaries spells the term without a hyphen in the definition but adds a hyphen in the usage example.]

7d   Navigator, // one at home on second part of 8? (5)

The numeral "8" is a cross reference indicator directing the solver to insert the solution to clue 8d in its place to complete the clue. The directional indicator is customarily omitted in situations such as this where only a single clue starts in the light* that is being referenced. 
* light-coloured cell in the grid
Sir Francis Drake[5] (circa 1540–1596) was an English sailor and explorer. He was the first Englishman to circumnavigate the globe (1577–80), in his ship the Golden Hind. He played an important part in the defeat of the Spanish Armada.

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Gazza describes Sir Francis Drake as a famous Elizabethan sea captain, navigator and bowler.
The most famous (but probably apocryphal) anecdote about Drake relates that, prior to the battle, he was playing a game of bowls* on Plymouth Hoe**. On being warned of the approach of the Spanish fleet, Drake is said to have remarked that there was plenty of time to finish the game and still beat the Spaniards. There is no known eyewitness account of this incident and the earliest retelling of it was printed 37 years later. Adverse winds and currents caused some delay in the launching of the English fleet as the Spanish drew nearer, perhaps prompting a popular myth of Drake's cavalier attitude to the Spanish threat.[7]
  * British name for lawn bowling
** Plymouth Hoe is a sloping ridge overlooking the English coastal city of Plymouth

8d   We dart and tear all over the place, /but/ fail to make progress! (5,5)

11d   Enid treated, end // not exactly established (13)

14d   Advocate anaesthetic? // Old issue (4,6)

"Number" is used in the whimsical cryptic crossword sense of something that numbs.

17d   Fall in love, /then/ become disillusioned (4,5)

19d   Foul-mouthed // supporter, English, supporting old hand (7)

By a strange coincidence, this clue has become rather timely with English soccer fans making their obnoxious presence felt at the EUFA Euro 2016[7] tournament currently underway in France.

20d   Female, Italian head, /in/ good health (7)

"Italian" = IT (show explanation )

This clueing might be explained in a couple of ways:
  • It.[10] is an abbreviation for Italian or Italy.

  • Italian[10] is another name for Italian vermouth. It[5] is an informal, dated British term for Italian vermouth ⇒ he poured a gin and it.
hide explanation

Ness[5] (a term usually found in place names) means a headland or promontory Orford Ness.

22d   Appeal /of/ tea room (5)

Cha (also chai) is an alternative spelling of char[5], an informal British name for tea.

24d   Try // to listen (4)
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon