Thursday, January 18, 2018

Thursday, January 18, 2018 — DT 28553

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28553
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Monday, October 9, 2017
Setter
Rufus (Roger Squires)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28553]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Miffypops
BD Rating
Difficulty - Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
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Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

With today's puzzle, Rufus has dialled the difficulty level down a notch or two from where it has been set recently. The difficulty level has been somewhat like the temperature here in Ottawa — +10 °C one day and -20 °C the next.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues. All-in-one (&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions are marked with a dotted underline. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//).

Across

1a   Giving up work /and/ going to bed (10)

9a   Vagrant /joins/ fireside circle (4)

Although a hob is located beside a fire, is the word truly synonymous with fireside?
A hob[5] is a flat metal shelf at the side of a fireplace, having its surface level with the top of the grate and used especially for heating pans.

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops describes hob as an archaic name for an oven or fireplace.
I was not able to substantiate the claim that hob was ever another name for an oven or fireplace. Oxford Dictionaries says that hob[5] in the sense of ‘metal shelf by a fireplace’, dates from the late 17th century.

Modern Usage
Hob[10] is a British term for the flat top part of a cooking stove, or a separate flat surface, containing hotplates [electrical heating elements] or burners [gas heating elements].



From a British perspective, hobo[5] is a North American term for a homeless person; in other words, a tramp or vagrant.

10a   Infuriated /when/ pact with police is broken (10)

11a   Paper /required/ that's first edition (6)

12a   Perform in the theatre? (7)

In this instance, the setter is generous in in flagging the cryptic definition with question mark ...

15a   One's success may be in the balance (7)

... but in this instance, he is in a more parsimonious mood.

16a   Listener gains two points /and/ makes money (5)

17a   Found /and/ thrown out (4)

18a   Board contest that calls for a series of counter-moves (4)

A counter[5] is a small disc used in board games for keeping the score or as a place marker.



Ludo[5] is the British name for a board game in in which players move counters round a board according to throws of a dice.

Delving Deeper
Ludo (from Latin ludo, "I play") is a strategy board game for two to four players, in which the players race their four tokens from start to finish according to the rolls of a single die.

Ludo is derived from the Indian game Pachisi, but simpler. The earliest evidence of this game in India is the depiction of boards on the caves of Ajanta (which date to the 2nd century BC). In England, Pachisi was modified to use a cubic die with dice cup and patented as "Ludo" in 1896.

The Royal Navy took Ludo and converted it into a board game called Uckers (as mentioned by Salty Dog in Comment #24 on Big Dave's Crossword Blog).

The game and its variations are popular in many countries and under various names. In North America, the game is sold under the brand name Parcheesi. Variations of the game are sold under the brand names Sorry!, Aggravation, and Trouble.

As a child, I actually owned a copy of this game — part of a compendium of board games which must have been imported from the UK — and so I am very familiar with the British name.

19a   Exclude // from French licensed premises (5)

"from French" = DE (show explanation )

In French, de[8] is a preposition meaning 'of'' or 'from'.

hide explanation

21a   One's choice will get cross (7)

22a   Dialect around // the Kremlin? (7)

Here, the question mark indicates that "the Kremlin" is an example of the required solution.

A kremlin[5] is a citadel within a Russian town with the Kremlin[5] denoting  the citadel in Moscow.

24a   I had to stand in line -- /it's/ neater (6)

27a   Made a claim /that should be/ upheld (10)

28a   Area /of/ Israeli city (4)

Acre[5] (also called Akko) is an seaport of Israel.

29a   Temple // altar, perhaps, inlaid with sort of nacre (10)

In biblical use, a tabernacle[5] is a fixed or movable dwelling, typically of light construction. The Tabernacle was a tent used as a sanctuary for the Ark of the Covenant by the Israelites during the Exodus and until the building of the Temple. Tabernacle[10] is also a name for the Jewish Temple regarded as the shrine of the divine presence.

Down

2d   Eastern agent /gets/ notice (4)

3d   Undermine // brat with look (6)

4d   Team endlessly receiving rising cheers /gets/ lift (7)

Eleven[5] is the number of players in* a cricket[7] side [team] or an Association football[7] [soccer] team — and is frequently used as a metonym for such a team ⇒ at cricket I played in the first eleven.

* Note that in Britain a player is "in a side" or "in a team" rather than "on a team" as one would say in North America.

Cheers[5] is an informal British expression of gratitude or acknowledgement for something ⇒ Billy tossed him the key. ‘Cheers, pal.’.

Ta[5] is an informal British exclamation signifying thank you ‘Ta,’ said Willie gratefully.

5d   Some at school may hoard // tuck (4)

Tuck[5] is a dated, informal British term for food eaten by children at school as a snack ⇒ (i) our parents provided us with a bit of money to buy tuck with; (ii) they send me a tuck box every month.

6d   Ecstatic, heading off madly /to make/ plans (7)

7d   Going home /and/ staying in? (10)

I am not aware that this question mark carries any particular significance.

8d   Genuine hard work -- // to the lions anyhow (6,4)

12d   Bands /of/ gold put on box by artists (10)

"gold" = OR (show explanation )

Or[5] is gold or yellow, as a heraldic tincture.

In heraldry, a tincture[5] is any of the conventional colours (including the metals and stains, and often the furs) used in coats of arms.

hide explanation

"artists" = RA (show explanation )

A Royal Academician (abbreviation RA[10]) is a member of the Royal Academy of Arts[5] (also Royal Academy; abbreviation also RA[10]), an institution established in London in 1768, whose purpose is to cultivate painting, sculpture, and architecture in Britain. 

hide explanation

13d   Long-running TV programme // possibly needs a rest (10)

EastEnders[7] is an award-winning British soap opera which has been broadcast on BBC One since 1985. Set in Albert Square in the East End of London in the fictional Borough of Walford, the programme follows the stories of local residents and their families as they go about their daily lives. Consistently among the top-rated TV programmes in Britain, it has tackled many dilemmas that are considered to be controversial and taboo issues in British culture and social life previously unseen on United Kingdom mainstream television.

14d   Keen /to show/ hesitation about decline? (5)

Does the question mark here indicate that the setter is suggesting that "age" may not necessarily be synonymous with "decline"?

15d   Extravaganza composed to entertain // WWI troops? (5)

Once again, as in 22a, the question mark signals a definition by example.

An Anzac[5] was a soldier in the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (1914–18).

19d   Step on it before the opening (7)

20d   A hot rod driver (7)

23d   CIA and RAF in collusion? A film was made out of it (6)

Out of Africa[7] is a 1985 American epic romantic drama film directed and produced by Sydney Pollack, and starring Robert Redford and Meryl Streep. The film is based loosely on the autobiographical book Out of Africa written by Isak Dinesen (the pseudonym of Danish author Karen Blixen), which was published in 1937, with additional material from Dinesen's book Shadows on the Grass and other sources. This film received 28 film awards, including seven Academy Awards.

25d   Branch // member (4)

26d   Have some sense, // charge learner (4)

"learner" = L (show explanation )

The cryptic crossword convention of L meaning learner or student arises from the L-plate[7], a square plate bearing a sans-serif letter L, for learner, which must be affixed to the front and back of a vehicle in various jurisdictions (including the UK) if its driver is a learner under instruction.

hide explanation
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
[12] - CollinsDictionary.com (Webster’s New World College Dictionary)
[13] - MacmillanDictionary.com (Macmillan Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018 — DT 28552

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28552
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Saturday, October 7, 2017
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28552 – Hints]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28552 – Review]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Big Dave (Hints)
crypticsue (Review)
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★ / ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
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└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
As this was a Saturday "Prize Puzzle" in Britain, there are two entries related to it on Big Dave's Crossword Blog — the first, posted on the date of publication, contains hints for selected clues while the second is a full review issued following the entry deadline for the contest. The vast majority of reader comments will generally be found attached to the "hints" posting with a minimal number — if any — accompanying the full review.

Introduction

Depending on whether you side with crypticsue or with many of those who comment at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, this puzzle may — or may not — be easier than those of the last couple of days. I did think that the setter may, at times, have pushed the boundaries of cryptic licence.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues. All-in-one (&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions are marked with a dotted underline. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//).

Across

1a   Like amateur in church, primarily (4)

This clue is at least a semi-all-in-one — if not a full-fledged all-in-one. There is no doubt that the entire clue provides the wordplay (dashed underline). I have conservatively marked only a portion of the clue as the definition (solid underline) making the clue a semi-all-in-one. However, should one believe the entire clue to be the definition, then the clue would be a true all-in-one.

Laic[5] (adjective) is a formal term denoting of the laity or secular.

3a   Bar bowler /for/ match between close rivals (5,5)

Local[5] is an informal British term for a pub convenient to a person’s home ⇒ a pint in the local.

Here and There
Bowler[5] (also bowler hat) is the British name for a man’s hard felt hat with a round dome-shaped crown. The North American name for this item of apparel is derby[5] — said to arise from American demand for a hat of the type worn at the Epsom Derby*.

* a prestigious British horse race — not to mention a major event on the British social calendar



This is a match between rivals who are geographically close.

Derby[2] (also local derby) is a British term for a race or a sports event or contest, especially a contest between teams from the same area.

Scratching the Surface
The surface reading is an allusion to cricket where a bowler[5] is member of the fielding side who bowls or is bowling — bowling[7] being  the action of propelling the ball toward the wicket defended by a batsman.

8a   Someone going mad /put/ butter on signalling device (8)

Butter is a whimsical cryptic crossword term for an uncastrated male sheep.

9a   Friend/'s/ stable occupation (6)

Mucker[5] is an informal British term for a friend or companion we felt like old muckers.



A mucker[5] is a person who removes dirt and waste, especially from mines or stables.

10a   Fight against // doctor in Ulster, perhaps (6)

"doctor" = MB (show explanation )

In Britain, the degree required to practice medicine is a Bachelor of Medicine[7] (MB, from Latin Medicinae Baccalaureus), which is equivalent to a North American Doctor of Medicine (MD, from Latin Medicinae Doctor). The degree of Doctor of Medicine also exists in Britain, but it is an advanced degree pursued by those who wish to go into medical research. Physicians in Britain are still addressed as Dr. despite not having a doctoral degree. 

hide explanation

An ulster[5] is a man’s long, loose overcoat of rough cloth, typically with a belt at the back.

Scratching the Surface
Properly Ulster[10] is an area that was a province and former kingdom of northern Ireland which passed to the English Crown in 1461. Following centuries of conflict, Ulster was partitioned in 1921, with six counties [Antrim, Down, Armagh, Londonderry, Tyrone, and Fermanagh] forming Northern Ireland (a region within the United Kingdom) and three counties [Cavan, Donegal, and Monaghan] joining the Republic of Ireland. Despite this, Ulster is a widely-used (albeit inaccurate) name for Northern Ireland.

11a   Jump over insects /in/ tight trousers (3,5)

Ski pants[5] are:
  • trousers worn for skiing
  • women's trousers made of stretchy fabric, having tapering legs and an elastic stirrup under each foot
Here and There
I must say that it rather surprised me to find the above usage in a British dictionary. In Britain, the word pants[5] usually does not mean trousers as it does in North America. Rather, it refers to underwear — specifically men's undershorts or women's panties (the latter otherwise known as knickers[5] to the Brits).

Could ski pants be an instance of American usage creeping into British English?

13a   Place for hard work /where/ someone having a row's unknown (8)

"unknown" = Y (show explanation )

In mathematics (algebra, in particular), an unknown[10] is a variable, or the quantity it represents, the value of which is to be discovered by solving an equation ⇒ 3y = 4x + 5 is an equation in two unknowns. [Unknowns are customarily represented symbolically by the letters x, y and z.]

hide explanation

Although the 's is a contraction for the word 'is' in the surface reading, it assumes a different identity in the cryptic reading where it becomes a contraction for the word 'has' (a charade indicator).

14a   Expression of disgust that man's picked up /as/ Poet Laureate once (6)

Ted Hughes[5] (1930–1998) was an English poet. His vision of the natural world as a place of violence, terror, and beauty pervades his work. He was appointed Poet Laureate in 1984, a post in which he served until his death. Hughes was married to American poet Sylvia Plath.

16a   Not moving? // It's shocking (6)

19a   Fashion designers (not one English) /// supplying outfit (8)


21a   Draws // little man as going after fling, being retired (8)

Tombola[5] is a British term for a game in which people pick tickets out of a revolving drum and certain tickets win immediate prizes, typically played at a fete* or fair ⇒ (i) entrance includes a tombola and raffle; (ii) traditional games such as tombola or bingo.

* Fete[5] (also fête) is a British term for a public function, typically held outdoors and organized to raise funds for a charity, including entertainment and the sale of goods and refreshments ⇒ a church fete.

22a   One who is hard up/'s/ written article about uranium (6)

The symbol for the chemical element uranium is U[5].

23a   Lark about entertaining old // soldiers (6)

In her review, crypticsue — who admits to working under time pressure as a last minute sub as reviewer — manages to use the word "about" twice in her explanation. The first instance (a reversal indicator) is correct. SPORT is clued merely by "lark" rather than "lark about".

24a   Scales, perhaps, // everything back after cut (8)

Prunella Scales[7] is an English actress perhaps best known on this side of the pond for her role as Basil Fawlty's wife Sybil in the BBC comedy Fawlty Towers. Big Dave illustrates his hint with a picture of John Cleese and Prunella Scales playing these roles.

25a   Observed // in animated dances (10)

There may be several respects in which observe and maintain could by synonymous.

In my view, the best explanation draws on the following senses of the words;
  • maintain[5] is an archaic term meaning to give one's support to or uphold ⇒ the king swears he will maintain the laws of God
  • observe[5] means to fulfil or comply with (a social, legal, ethical, or religious obligation) ⇒ a tribunal must observe the principles of natural justice
At a stretch, one might see the following meanings as being somewhat synonymous, although there would seem to be a significant difference between making a casual observation and stating a strongly-held belief:
  • observe[5] meaning to make a remark ⇒ (i) It's chilly,’ she observed; (ii) a stockbroker once observed that dealers live and work in hell 
  • maintain[5] meaning state something strongly to be the case or assert (i) he has always maintained his innocence; (ii) he had persistently maintained that he would not stand against his old friend.
Finally, observe[5] can mean to maintain (silence) in compliance with a rule or custom, or temporarily as a mark of respect a minute's silence will be observed.

26a   Book // dedication of egotist (4)

Down

1d   Songwriters // call up securing one in charts (9)

2d   International sportsman with skill getting bronze -- // he enhanced many grounds (10,5)

Cap[5] is a British term for:
  • a cap awarded as a sign of membership of a particular sports team, especially a national team [a team representing a country in international competition] ⇒ he has won three caps for Scotland; or
  • a player to whom a cap is awarded ⇒ a former naval officer and rugby cap.
Capability Brown[5] (1716–1783) was an English landscape gardener; born Lancelot Brown. He evolved an English style of natural-looking landscape parks. Notable examples of his work are at Blenheim Palace, Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, and Kew Gardens.

3d   Someone who's left something // Eastern accepted by ambassador (7)

Legate[5] is an archaic term for an ambassador or messenger. In modern diplomatic circles, it would appear that a legate[10] may be a messenger, envoy, or delegate holding less than ambassadorial rank with the possible exception of the Roman Catholic Church where the term denotes an emissary to a foreign state representing the Pope.

4d   Brief agreement raised /as/ gesture of respect (7)

5d   Stolid // politician, one accosted by drunk (7)

"politician" = MP (show explanation )

In Britain (as in Canada), a politician elected to the House of Commons is known as a Member of Parliament[10] (abbreviation MP[5]) or, informally, as a member[5].

hide explanation

I really can't see any justification for "accosted by" to be a containment indicator.



I also find the definition to be quite a stretch.

Stolid[5] means calm, dependable, and showing little emotion or animation ⇒ a stolid bourgeois gent.

Lumpish[5] (said of a person) means stupid and lethargic I had really been rather lumpish and dull during the drive.

6d   One being taught abroad // scanned huge text for translation (8,7)

7d   Police HQ's // measures (5)

Despite what crypticsue shows in her review, this is not a double definition but rather a charade of YARD (police HQ) + S ('s).

The Yard[5] is an informal British term for Scotland Yard[5], the headquarters of the London Metropolitan Police, situated from 1829 to 1890 in Great Scotland Yard off Whitehall, from 1890 until 1967 in New Scotland Yard on the Thames Embankment, and from 1967 in New Scotland Yard, Westminster.

12d   Fix // match (3)

North Americans might see "match" and "tie" to be synonymous as verbs meaning 'to equal' as in In his final run, the driver was able to match the best time posted so far in the competition. However, Brits are almost certainly going to interpret the clue in a different light.

Tie[5] is a British term meaning a sports match between two or more players or teams in which the winners proceed to the next round of the competition ⇒ Swindon Town have gained themselves a third round tie* against Oldham.

* This does not mean — as a North American might suppose — that Swindon Town and Oldham played to a draw in the third round. Rather, it means that Swindon Town defeated their opponent in the second round and will move on to face Oldham in the third round.

15d   Angus turned up with mysterious // source of sweetness (5,4)

17d   Anything from Yorkshire upset // a couple (3)

In Northern English* dialect, owt[5] means anything ⇒ I didn't say owt.

* Northern England[5] is an area that extends from Cheshire and the northern part of Lincolnshire through Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cumbria, Durham, and Northumberland to the Scottish border. It is roughly that part of England that is located north of the northern coast of Wales.

18d   Ascending selection from Pat's electric // keyboard instrument (7)

A celesta[5] is a small keyboard instrument in which felted hammers strike a row of steel plates suspended over wooden resonators, giving an ethereal bell-like sound.

19d   Comical stand-up, // collector of dirty material (7)

20d   Talk at length about // old stamp (7)

I have taken a slightly different approach than crypticsue in the way that I have marked the definition. The verb expound can be either transitive (meaning to talk at length about) or intransitive (meaning to talk at length). I would consider it to be the former as otherwise, one would have to classify the word "about" as a link word (which really does not work for me).

21d   Carry on miles -- // something regarded with awe (5)
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
[12] - CollinsDictionary.com (Webster’s New World College Dictionary)
[13] - MacmillanDictionary.com (Macmillan Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Tuesday, January 16, 2018 — DT 28551

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28551
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Friday, October 6, 2017
Setter
Giovanni (Don Manley)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28551]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Deep Threat
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved

Introduction

Giovanni has maintained the elevated pace of workout established yesterday by RayT.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues. All-in-one (&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions are marked with a dotted underline. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//).

Across

1a   It may mean junk ends up as junk! (9)

A junk[5] is a flat-bottomed sailing vessel of a kind typical of China and the East Indies, with a prominent stem and lugsails.

9a   Something not what it seems? // This person's about to get very cross (6)

"this person's" = IM (show explanation )

It is a common cryptic crossword convention for the creator of the puzzle to use terms such as (the or this) compiler, (the or this) setter, (this) author, (this) writer, or this person to refer to himself or herself. To solve such a clue, one must generally substitute a first person pronoun (I or me) for whichever of these terms has been used in the clue.

Today, the setter has made the scenario slightly more complicated by combining "this person" with the verb "to be" producing "this person's" (a contraction of "this person is") which must be replaced by "I'm" (a contraction of "I am").

hide explanation

10a   Lights by promontory /shown in/ picture (9)

Behind the Picture
Deep Threat illustrates his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog with View on the Stour near Dedham (1822) by English Romantic painter John Constable[7] (1776–1837). Born in Suffolk in eastern England, Constable is known principally for his landscape paintings of Dedham Vale, the area surrounding his home — now known as "Constable Country".

11a   Hunter/'s/ drink -- not the first (6)

12a   Composer /in/ Swiss city with beer mug (9)

Bern is an alternative spelling of Berne[5], the capital of Switzerland since 1848.

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Deep Threat describes Bern as [t]he Swiss city famous for its bear pits.
The Bärengraben[7], or Bear Pit, is a tourist attraction in Bern. It is a bear pit, or enclosure housing bears, situated at the eastern edge of the old city of Bern. The Bärengraben is a Swiss heritage site of national significance, and is of particular significance in Bern because the bear is a symbol of both the city and surrounding canton, and is featured in their coat of arms.



Although Deep Threat focuses on one famous composer, there is also a second one of that name.

Leonard Bernstein[5] (1918–1990) was a US composer, conductor, and pianist. He was a conductor with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra 1945–48 and 1957–69. Notable works: The Age of Anxiety (symphony, 1947–49), West Side Story (musical, 1957), and music for the movie On the Waterfront (1954).

Elmer Bernstein*[7] (1922–2004) was an American composer and conductor who is best known for his many film scores. In a career which spanned fifty years, he composed music for hundreds of film and television productions. His most popular works include the scores to The Magnificent Seven, The Ten Commandments, The Great Escape, To Kill a Mockingbird, Ghostbusters, The Black Cauldron, Airplane!, The Rookies, Cape Fear, Animal House, and The Age of Innocence. He won an Oscar for his score to Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967).

* He was not related to the celebrated composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein; but the two men were friends. Within the world of professional music, they were distinguished from each other by the use of the nicknames Bernstein West (Elmer) and Bernstein East (Leonard). They pronounced their last names differently; Elmer pronounced his (BERN-steen), and Leonard's was (BERN-stine).

13a   Article penned by a foreign Socialist /is/ not perused (6)

"a foreign" = UN, the masculine singular form of the indefinite article in French, Italian and Spanish (show explanation )

In French, the masculine singular form of the indefinite article is un[8].

 In Italian, the masculine singular form of the indefinite article is un[8].

In Spanish, the masculine singular form of the indefinite article is un[8].

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17a   Edmund falling over /in/ pit (3)

Ned[7] is an English given name and variant of Ed*, sometimes short for Edward, Edmund, Edgar, or Edwin.

* "Ned" may have risen from generations of children hearing "mine Ed" as "my Ned" (an example of a process linguists call rebracketing).

19a   Criticise a revolutionary /for/ grand manner (7)

"revolutionary" = CHE (show explanation )

Che Guevara[7] (1928–1967) was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion and global insignia within popular culture.

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20a   Someone who sees what you can see (7)

In its first instance, see[10] is used in the sense of to to ascertain or find out (a fact).

21a   Black bird rolls over /in/ this bundle (3)

Daw[5] is another term for jackdaw[5], a small grey-headed crow that typically nests in tall buildings and chimneys, noted for its inquisitiveness.

23a   Saint /in/ ruin needing money (6)

Tin[5] is a dated informal British term for money ⇒ Kim’s only in it for the tin.

Saint Martin of Tours[5] (316 or 336 – 397) was Bishop of Tours, whose shrine in France became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

Behind the Picture

Saint Martin is best known for the account of his using his military sword* to cut his cloak in two, to give half to a beggar clad only in rags in the depth of winter (depicted in the illustration in Deep Threat's review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog).

* Conscripted as a soldier into the Roman army, he found the duty incompatible with the Christian faith he had adopted and became an early conscientious objector.

27a   Terrible US baddies /must be/ set free from wrong ideas (9)

28a   Veto is exercised /in/ council (6)

Soviet[5] can refer to either:
  • an elected local, district, or national council in the former Soviet Union
  • a revolutionary council of workers or peasants in Russia before 1917
29a   Carpet // material by edge and at the back (9)

Rep[5] (also repp) is a fabric with a ribbed surface, used in curtains and upholstery.



Carpet[5] is British* slang meaning to reprimand severelythe Chancellor of the Exchequer carpeted the bank bosses.

* Although we do not use this expression in North America, we certainly use the presumably related expression to be called on the carpet[5].

30a   Blunders /made by/ English bishop at back of basilica (6)

"bishop" = RR (show explanation )

Right Reverend[5] (abbreviation RR[2]) is a title given to a bishop, especially in the Anglican Church ⇒ the Right Reverend David Jenkins, Bishop of Durham.

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31a   See red and act violently, /bringing/ 6 (9)

The numeral "6" is a cross reference indicator directing the solver to insert the solution to clue 6d in its place to complete the clue. The directional indicator is customarily omitted in situations such as this where only a single clue starts in the light* that is being referenced.

* light-coloured cell in the grid

Note that although the solution to 6d is a noun, it transforms into a verb in the present clue.

Down

2d   Blissful place // in the avenue (6)

3d   Quiet editor, worker // who pays attention to good grammar? (6)

"quiet" = P (show explanation )

Piano[3,5] (abbreviation p[5]), is a musical direction meaning either (as an adjective) soft or quiet or (as an adverb) softly or quietly.

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"worker" = ANT (show explanation )

The word "worker" and the phrase "social worker" are commonly used in cryptic crossword puzzles to clue ANT or BEE.

A worker[5] is a neuter or undeveloped female bee, wasp, ant, or other social insect, large numbers of which do the basic work of the colony.

In crossword puzzles, "worker" will most frequently be used to clue ANT and occasionally BEE but I have yet to see it used to clue WASP. Of course, "worker" is sometimes also used to clue HAND or MAN.

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4d   Declaim /as/ English Conservative joining in ceremony (6)

"Conservative" = C (show explanation )

The abbreviation for Conservative may be either C.[10] or Con.[10].

The Conservative Party[5] is a a major British political party that emerged from the old Tory Party* under Sir Robert Peel in the 1830s and 1840s. Since the Second World War, it has been in power 1951–64, 1970-74, and 1979–97. It governed in a coalition with the Liberal Democrats from 2010 until the general election of May 2015, in which it was returned with a majority.

* Historically, a Tory[10] was a member of the English political party that opposed the exclusion of James, Duke of York from the royal succession (1679–80). Tory remained the label for subsequent major conservative interests until they gave birth to the Conservative Party in the 1830s.

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5d   Bill coming up -- what is charged /is/ something fanciful (7)

6d   Is husband getting on held in serious // ignominy? (9)

7d   Leader of society wants fairness organised // without any frills (4,5)

San serif[5] (adjective) is a printing term meaning without serifs*.

* A serif[5] is a slight projection finishing off a stroke of a letter in certain typefaces.

8d   Rob /and/ Pete dread being made to look silly (9)

Depredate[5] means to steal from, typically using force; in other words, to plunder (i) many types of predators depredate bird nests; (ii) wandering flocks of pigeons depredating barley crops.

14d   Someone having agents // to sort out party mess (9)

15d   English partygoers? // They get into the groove (9)

16d   /With/ stress beginning to spread around, I had // bad things happening (9)

Deep Threat seems to have missed a letter in his solution on Big Dave's Crossword Blog. The wordplay parses as {ACCENT (stress) + S (beginning to [initial letter of] Spread)} containing (around) ID (I had; contracted as I'd).

Despite being positioned at the beginning of the clue, the word "with" is equivalent to a link word. From a cryptic perspective, the clue might be expressed as:
  • Bad things happening /with/ stress beginning to spread around I had (9)
Of course, this change would destroy the surface reading.

17d   One day rising /to find/ dampness (3)

18d   Sign of approval // in words regularly trotted out (3)

A regular sequence of letters (in this case, the even-numbered ones) from "iN wOrDs" is brought out for others to see or admire (trotted out[12]).

22d   Irritability in an east // Texas city (7)

Bile[5] is used in the sense of anger or irritability ⇒ that topic is sure to stir up plenty of bile.



Abilene[5] is a city in north central Texas, an agricultural and oil industry center.

24d   Author /with/ obstacle, not finishing (6)

Sir J. M. Barrie[5] (1860–1937) was a Scottish dramatist and novelist; full name James Matthew Barrie. Barrie’s most famous play is Peter Pan (1904), a fantasy for children about a boy who did not grow up.

25d   Drink repeatedly being knocked over /leads to/ grumble (6)

26d   Note put up: // 'We need this for cheese- making' (6)

Tenner[5] is an informal British name for a ten-pound note.



Rennet[5] is curdled milk from the stomach of an unweaned calf, containing rennin and used in curdling milk for cheese.
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
[12] - CollinsDictionary.com (Webster’s New World College Dictionary)
[13] - MacmillanDictionary.com (Macmillan Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon