Friday, August 18, 2017

Friday, August 18, 2017 — DT 28442

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28442
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Thursday, June 1, 2017
Setter
RayT (Ray Terrell)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28442]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Kath
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Thursday, August 17, 2017 — DT 28441

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28441
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Wednesday, May 31, 2017
Setter
Jay (Jeremy Mutch)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28441]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
2Kiwis
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Wednesday, August 16, 2017 — DT 28440

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28440
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28440]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Mr Kitty
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★ / ★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Tuesday, August 15, 2017 — DT 28339

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28439
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Monday, May 29, 2017
Setter
Rufus (Roger Squires)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28339]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Miffypops
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction


I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Monday, August 14, 2017

Monday, August 14, 2017 — DT 28438 (Published Saturday, August 12, 2017)

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28438
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Saturday, May 27, 2017
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28438 — Hints]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28438 — Review]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Big Dave (Hints)
crypticsue (Review)
BD Rating
Difficulty - Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
As this was a Saturday "Prize Puzzle" in Britain, there are two entries related to it on Big Dave's Crossword Blog — the first, posted on the date of publication, contains hints for selected clues while the second is a full review issued following the entry deadline for the contest. The vast majority of reader comments will generally be found attached to the "hints" posting with a minimal number — if any — accompanying the full review.
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Saturday, August 12, 2017 — I've Got a Secret

Introduction

Lots of secrets are revealed as you work your way through today's puzzle from Cox & Rathvon. Thanks to Henry for supplying the solution while I basked in the sun oblivious to the outside world.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Friday, August 11, 2017

Friday, August 11, 2017 — DT 28437

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28437
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Friday, May 26, 2017
Setter
Giovanni (Don Manley)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28437]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Tilsit
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Thursday, August 10, 2017 — DT 28436

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28336
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Thursday, May 25, 2017
Setter
Shamus (Philip Marlow)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28436]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Falcon
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 — DT 28435

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28435
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Wednesday, May 24, 2017
Setter
Jay (Jeremy Mutch)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28335]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
2Kiwis
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Tuesday, August 8, 2017 — DT 28434

Vacation Edition
Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28434
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Tuesday, May 23, 2017
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28334]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Mr Kitty
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
I am currently on vacation. Today's abbreviated posting was prepared prior to my departure and provides a link to the review at Big Dave's Crossword Blog for the puzzle that I expect to be published today. However, the National Post has been known to alter its publication schedule unexpectedly, so there is no guarantee that my forecast will necessarily prove to be accurate.

Introduction

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for today — Falcon

Monday, August 7, 2017

Monday, August 7, 2017 — DT 28433 (Published Saturday, August 5, 2017)

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28433
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Monday, May 22, 2017
Setter
Rufus (Roger Squires)
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28433]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Miffypops
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
███████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
This puzzle appears on the Monday Diversions page in the Saturday, August 5, 2017 edition of the National Post.

Introduction

Today finds Rufus at the top of his form; it also finds him in the National Post on the day his puzzles customarily appear in the UK.

My podium finishers today are 21a, 8d, and 22d with 8d narrowly edging out 22d for the gold.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues. All-in-one (&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions are marked with a dotted underline. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//).

Across

1a   They are buried in peace (8)

6a   Cracked a nut, go /for/ something sweet (6)

9a   It sounds quite cold but it may be hot (6)

10a   Dance around on broken toe? /Might make/ a good story (8)

11a   Willing // scholar returned to provide means (8)

12a   Quiet little brook // anything but quiet (6)

13a   Welcome salesman, game to go back and pursue // easier way to pay? (4-8)

"game" = RU (show explanation )

Rugby union[10] (abbreviation RU[5]) is a form of rugby football played between teams of 15 players (in contrast to rugby league[5], which is played in teams of thirteen).

 Rugby union[7] is is the national sport in New Zealand, Wales, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga and Madagascar.

hide explanation

Hire purchase[5] (abbreviation h.p. or HP[5]) is a British term for a system by which one pays for a thing in regular instalments while having the use of it [the equivalent North American term would be rent-to-own[7]].

16a   Immediately // how one knows that someone is surprised (4,3,5)

19a   Pay // to stay (6)

21a   Retired people won't get such a fanciful idea (8)

23a   Clumsy lout made // to tone down remarks? (8)

24a   Astronaut // found in local, drinking (6)

Buzz Aldrin[7] (born Edwin Eugene Aldrin Jr.) is an American engineer and former astronaut. As the Lunar Module Pilot on Apollo 11, he was one of the first two humans to land on the Moon, and the second person to walk on it, following mission commander Neil Armstrong.

Scratching the Surface
Local[5] is an informal British term for a pub convenient to a person’s home ⇒ a pint in the local.

25a   Slow movement /gets/ a soldier in trouble (6)

"soldier" = GI (show explanation )

A GI[5] is a private soldier in the US army ⇒ she went off with a GI during the war.

Contrary to popular belief, the term apparently is not an abbreviation for general infantryman, but rather derives from the term government (or general) issue (originally denoting equipment supplied to US forces).

hide explanation

Adagio[5] is a musical term denoting (especially as a direction) in slow time.

26a   A glass // ship (8)

Here and There
A schooner is a glass on both sides of the pond — albeit very different ones.

In Britain, a schooner[5] is a glass for drinking a large measure of sherry, whereas in North American — as well as Australia and New Zealand — the term denotes a tall beer glass.

Down

2d   Relaxed // reception (2-4)

An at-home[5] is;
  • a party in a person's home
  • a dated term for a period when a person has announced that they will receive visitors in their home
3d   Stop // small company taking fifty on (5)

Stop[5] is a dated British term for a punctuation mark, especially a full stop*.

* The punctuation mark (.) known as a period[5] in North America is called a full stop[5] by the British.

4d   Dine out on hot food when up /in/ northern capital (9)

Edinburgh[5] is the capital of Scotland, on the southern shore of the Firth of Forth; population 449,100 (est. 2009). The city grew up round the 11th-century castle built by Malcolm III on a rocky ridge that dominates the landscape.

5d   Mix a cocktail, say, /and/ get fish in to eat (5,2)

... mix this cocktail to suit James Bond.

The hake[5] is any of several species of large-headed elongated fish with long jaws and strong teeth. It is a valuable commercial food fish.

6d   When the devil drives, they must (5)

Needs[5] is an archaic term denoting 'of necessity' as in the phrases:
  • must needs (or needs must) do something meaning cannot avoid or cannot help doing something ⇒ they must needs depart
  • needs must meaning it is or was necessary or unavoidable ⇒ if needs must, they will eat any food
"Needs must when the devil drives"[*] is a proverb meaning when you are desperate, you must do things you ordinarily would not do ⇒ We're going to have to get an enormous loan to pay for your mother's surgery. I hate to go into debt, but needs must when the devil drives.

* McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

7d   Was inadequate as an air gunner /and/ fell short as a pilot (9)

8d   Its members draw on the master's guidance (3,5)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops describes the solution as a cryptic definition of a form of students studying how to draw.

In Britain, a form[5] is [or, perhaps more correctly,was] a class or year in a school, usually given a specifying number. Thus what we in North America would call a grade would be — or once was — known in Britain as a form, although the numbering system for forms and grades are vastly different. (show more )

The term "form" seems to have become passé as Miffypops in his review of DT 28163 on Big Dave's Crossword Blog refers to "sixth-former" as "What a schoolchild would be during the year before university back in the old days. This would now be known as year 13 or 14." Furthermore, Wikipedia (see table below) characterizes the term "form" as an "alternative/old name".

A form[7] is a class or grouping of students in a school. The term is used predominantly in the United Kingdom, although some schools, mostly private, in other countries also use the title. Pupils are usually grouped in forms according to age and will remain with the same group for a number of years, or sometimes their entire school career.

Forms are normally identified by a number such as "first form" or "sixth form". A form number may be used for two year groups and differentiated by the terms upper and lower [in general, this would seem to apply primarily for the sixth form]. Usually the sixth form is the senior form of a school [although this apparently does not hold true for New Zealand where they would appear to have a seventh form]. In England, the sixth form is usually divided into two year groups, the lower sixth and upper sixth, owing to the 3-year English college/university system. In Scotland or North America, the 6th form is usually a single year, owing to the 4-year college/university system. If there is more than one form for each year group they will normally be differentiated by letters, e.g., "upper four B", "lower two Y". Schools do not follow a consistent pattern in naming forms [in the foregoing quotation witness Miffypops' reference to "year 14",  a term which does not appear in the table below].

Wikipedia would appear to be at best ambiguous and at worst inconsistent on the relationship between the British and American systems of naming school years. The article from which the table below is excerpted shows that the British first form is equivalent to the American 6th grade. On the other hand, the article cited above states "In North America, the 1st Form (or sometimes 'Form I') is equivalent to 7th Grade." However, this latter statement may in fact be a comparison between the few North American schools to use the form system and the vast majority of North American schools that don't rather than a comparison between British and American schools.

 Age RangeBritish SystemAmerican System
NameAlternative/Old NameName
11-12Year 7First form6th grade
12-13Year 8Second form7th grade
13-14Year 9Third form8th grade
14-15Year 10Fourth form9th grade
15-16Year 11Fifth form10th grade
16-17Year 12Lower sixth form11th grade
17-18Year 13Upper sixth form12th grade

hide explanation

13d   Powerless /to get/ substandard player suspended (9)

14d   Yard chase forged // money (5,4)

Ready cash is another term for ready money[5,10], funds for immediate use or, in other words, available money or cash.

15d   Title that's used in all-in wrestling? (8)

Rufus used this very clue in DT 28145 (The Daily Telegraph: Monday, June 20, 2016; National Post: Thursday, October 6, 2016). What's good for the goose is good for the gander, so I will just repeat what I wrote then.

Freehold[5] is a British term denoting permanent and absolute tenure of land or property with freedom to dispose of it at will.

All-in wrestling[5,10] is a British term (seemingly dated in professional application but not in common parlance) for wrestling with few or no restrictions. This style of no-holds-barred wresting is also known as freestyle wrestling (although it should certainly not be confused with Olympic freestyle wrestling).

I don't believe that "freehold" is actually a wrestling term; I think we are supposed to decipher it from the fact that a participant is free to employ virtually any hold whatsoever in a competition. Based on this, I have not marked the clue as a double definition but rather as a cryptic definition comprising a straight definition (solid underline) and cryptic elaboration (dashed underline).

Delving Deeper
Professional wrestling in the Greco Roman style — a style of wrestling which forbids holds below the waist — had enjoyed considerable popularity in Britain during the Edwardian era, but had dwindled and died out by the outbreak of World War I, although various styles of amateur wrestling continued as legitimate sports. One of these was Catch As Catch Can[7] wrestling, a freestyle form of wrestling that was developed in Britain circa 1870. When Catch As Catch Can wrestling reached the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century it became extremely popular.

Wrestling as a promotional business (as opposed to a legitimate sport) did not return to Britain until the beginning of the 1930s when the success of the more worked* aspects of professional wrestling in America, like gimmickry and showmanship, were introduced to British wrestling. It was with this revival that the more submission-based Catch As Catch Can wrestling style, which had already replaced Greco Roman wrestling as the dominant style of professional wrestling in the United States back in the 1890s, became the new dominant style in Britain.
* In wrestling lingo, work means anything planned to happen, from the carnival tradition of "working the crowd". Thus "worked" means planned or scripted.
All-in wrestling[7] was the first wave of professional wrestling in the United Kingdom to be based on the Catch As Catch Can style of wrestling. It was conducted under the All-In Rules of 1930 in which (unlike Olympic freestyle wrestling) no holds were prohibited.

The name All In later became synonymous with more anarchic professional wrestling shows, leading to censure by local authorities by the late 1930s. Consequently, the All In label was disowned by most British wrestling promoters following the adoption of the 1947 Mountevans rules and replaced by the term Modern Freestyle.

Despite the rejection of the name "All In" by British wrestling promoters, the term continued to be used in the UK to refer to professional wrestling - often in a derogatory sense by non-fans. An example of its use in this context is in the Monty Python's Flying Circus sketch "All In Cricket" which depicts two cricketers dueling with cricket bats in a wrestling ring.



Although it really has nothing to do with the clue under consideration, I thought I would share a tidbit [or, for British readers, titbit] of information that I stumbled upon in my research for this clue.

It seems that after attempting for many decades to maintain the pretense that professional wrestling was not fake, wrestling promoters actually testified before lawmakers that wrestling was in fact staged — all in an effort to escape paying the taxes which applied to legitimate professional sporting events.

In professional wrestling, kayfabe[7] is the portrayal of staged events within the industry as "real" or "true," specifically the portrayal of competition, rivalries, and relationships between participants as being genuine and not of a staged or pre-determined nature of any kind. Kayfabe has also evolved to become a code word of sorts for maintaining this "reality" within the direct or indirect presence of the general public. Though the staged nature of professional wrestling had been a frequent topic of conversation among the media and public since at least the latter years of the early 20th century, the professional wrestling industry did not formally acknowledge this until changes in the business during the 1980s professional wrestling boom prompted attitudes within the business to change. In 1989, World Wrestling Federation owner Vince McMahon testified before the New Jersey state senate that wrestling was staged. Long sanctioned by New Jersey and other states as an athletic exhibition for regulation and taxation purposes, McMahon sought to eliminate oversight, and hence taxation, on the WWF's house shows and pay-per-view events held within the state.

17d   Gloomy study son /makes/ blue (7)

18d   Local // vet in a shambles (6)

20d   A long time to // muse (5)

In Greek and Roman mythology, Erato[5] was the Muse* of lyric poetry and hymns.

* The Muses[5] are nine goddesses, the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, who preside over the arts and sciences.

Unconventional?
Rufus treads dangerously close to contravening — and perhaps does contravene — a cryptic crossword convention that holds that while it is acceptable for the setter to unnecessarily capitalize words to create misdirection, it is not acceptable to omit necessary capitalization. Since the definition refers specifically to one of the Muses of Greek and Roman mythology, should it not be capitalized?

The uncapitalized modern use of the word "muse" really has a somewhat different meaning.

22d   One can't see what it offers as entertainment (5)

What did he say?
In his review on Big Dave's Crossword Blog, Miffypops refers to the solution as a wireless set.
Wireless[5] is a dated British term for a radio ⇒ listening to the news on the wireless.
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
[12] - CollinsDictionary.com (Webster’s New World College Dictionary)
[13] - MacmillanDictionary.com (Macmillan Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Saturday, August 5, 2017 — Cox & Rathvon (Preliminary Post)

Introduction

Here is today's puzzle from Cox & Rathvon. As I am camping with minimal access to electricity and Internet, you may be on your own for a solution this week.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Signing off for the moment — Falcon

Friday, August 4, 2017

Friday, August 4, 2017 — DT 28432

Puzzle at a Glance
Puzzle Number in The Daily Telegraph
DT 28432
Publication Date in The Daily Telegraph
Saturday, May 20, 2017
Setter
Unknown
Link to Full Review
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28432 – Hints]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog [DT 28432 – Review]
Big Dave's Crossword Blog Review Written By
Big Dave (Hints)
gnomethang (Review)
BD Rating
Difficulty - ★★ Enjoyment - ★★★
Falcon's Experience
┌────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┬────┐
██████████████████████████████████
└────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┴────┘
Legend:
- solved without assistance
- incorrect prior to use of puzzle solving tools
- solved with assistance from puzzle solving tools
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by puzzle solving tools
- solved but without fully parsing the clue
- unsolved or incorrect prior to visiting Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- solved with aid of checking letters provided by solutions from Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- reviewed by Falcon for Big Dave's Crossword Blog
- yet to be solved
Notes
As this was a Saturday "Prize Puzzle" in Britain, there are two entries related to it on Big Dave's Crossword Blog — the first, posted on the date of publication, contains hints for selected clues while the second is a full review issued following the entry deadline for the contest. The vast majority of reader comments will generally be found attached to the "hints" posting with a minimal number — if any — accompanying the full review.

Introduction

We finish off the week with what was a "Saturday prize puzzle" in the UK. It is not too difficult and we encounter in it an incidence of the rather rare triple definition.

On the podium today, I have placed 12a, 29a, and 9d with the nod going to 29a for having bested me.

I invite you to leave a comment to let us know how you fared with the puzzle.

Notes on Today's Puzzle

This commentary is intended to serve as a supplement to the review of this puzzle found at Big Dave's Crossword Blog, to which a link is provided in the table above.

Primary indications (definitions) are marked with a solid underline in the clue; subsidiary indications (be they wordplay or other) are marked with a dashed underline in semi-all-in-one (semi-&lit.) clues. All-in-one (&lit.) clues and cryptic definitions are marked with a dotted underline. Explicit link words and phrases are enclosed in forward slashes (/link/) and implicit links are shown as double forward slashes (//).

Across

1a   Work out chairman/'s/ bust on board (10)

6a   Go // crazy when rejected (4)

10a   Mole's friend /is/ irritable (5)

Mole[7] and Rat[7], the latter known as "Ratty" to his friends, are two of the main characters in The Wind in the Willows[7], a children's novel by British writer Kenneth Grahame (1859–1932), first published in 1908.

Ratty[5] is an informal British term meaning bad-tempered and irritable ⇒ I was a bit ratty with the children.

11a   Very East European to be losing head, /that's/ common (9)

12a   Racer over 8 furlongs holds nothing back, /being/ one that works hard before Ascot (8)

A furlong[5] is an eighth of a mile or 220 yards.

Ascot Racecourse[7], located in Ascot, Berkshire, England, is one of the leading racecourses in the United Kingdom for thoroughbred horse racing.

The Royal Ascot[7], held each year in June at Ascot Racecourse in England, comprises a series of horse races spread over a period of five days. Dating back to 1711 when it was founded by Queen Anne, it is a major event in the British social calendar, and press coverage of the attendees and what they are wearing often exceeds coverage of the actual racing. Day three (Thursday) is known colloquially (but not officially) as Ladies' Day.

The most prestigious viewing area is the Royal Enclosure which has a strictly enforced dress code. For women, only a day dress with a hat is acceptable, with rules applying to the length and style of the dress. In addition, women must not show bare midriffs or shoulders. For men, black or grey morning dress with top hat is required.

13a   Nick // excluding Switzerland (5)

The International Vehicle Registration (IVR) code for Switzerland is CH[5] [from French Confédération Helvétique 'Swiss Confederation'].

15a   Water tower (7)

17a   The Parisian visiting most of close // outside the church (7)

"the Parisian" = LA (show explanation )

In French, the feminine singular form of the definite article is la[8].

hide explanation

Scratching the Surface
In the surface reading, close[5] is a British term for the precinct surrounding a cathedral.

19a   Man marooned on Treasure Island long time /finds/ large-leaved plant (7)

Benjamin "Ben" Gunn[7] is a fictional character in the novel Treasure Island by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson. Gunn has been marooned for three years on Treasure Island by his crewmates, after his failure to find the treasure without the map.

Gunnera[5] is a South American plant with extremely large leaves that resemble rhubarb and which is grown as a waterside ornamental.

21a   The Royal Marines heading lowly sailor/'s/ vessel (7)

"Royal Marines" = RM (show explanation )

The Royal Marines[5] (abbreviation RM)[5] is a British armed service (part of the Royal Navy) founded in 1664, trained for service at sea, or on land under specific circumstances.

hide explanation

Ordinary seaman[5] (abbreviation OS[5]) is the lowest rank of sailor in the Royal Navy, below able seaman.

22a   A person from the Far North returning /in/ shock (5)

A Lapp[5] is a member of an indigenous people of the extreme north of Scandinavia, traditionally associated with the herding of reindeer.

24a   Simple // detective joke, as some would tell it (8)

Sherlock Holmes[7] is a fictional character created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930). A London-based "consulting detective" whose abilities border on the fantastic, Holmes is known for his astute logical reasoning, his ability to adopt almost any disguise and his use of forensic science to solve difficult cases.

27a   Teen cried out -- // act as peacemaker (9)

28a   Reactionary fellow // that's full of gas (5)

Here and There
Blimp[5] is an informal British term for a pompous, reactionary type of person you'll still find Colonel Blimps at local party level.

Blimp[5] is an informal North American term for a fat person I could work out four hours a day and still end up a blimp.

29a   Standard // choice of letters from the middle of the alphabet (4)

Having selected the letters L, M, N, and O "from the middle of the alphabet", I was at a loss to explain how R replaces L. Sometimes when one gets even ever so slightly offtrack, it is hard to get back on.

30a   Hamlet/'s/ resolution (10)

Scratching the Surface
Hamlet[7] (in full The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark) is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare at an uncertain date between 1599 and 1602. Set in Denmark, the play dramatises the revenge Prince Hamlet is called to wreak upon his uncle, Claudius, by the ghost of Hamlet's father, King Hamlet. Claudius had murdered his own brother and seized the throne, also marrying his deceased brother's widow.

Down

1d   Stable // business (4)

2d   Elderly // mounting // clicking (7,2)

3d   Top person // bet gold goes up (5)

"gold" = OR (show explanation )

Or[5] is gold or yellow, as a heraldic tincture.

In heraldry, a tincture[5] is any of the conventional colours (including the metals and stains, and often the furs) used in coats of arms.

hide explanation

4d   Shelter to put up // pauper (4-3)

5d   Entire river's // charms (7)

The River Ure[7] is a stream in North Yorkshire, England, approximately 74 miles (119 km) long from its source to the point where it changes name to the River Ouse.

7d   It is not commonly // a corrupting influence (5)

8d   Magistrates and journalists // bear great weight (5-5)

The verb bench-press[5] means to raise (a weight) in a bench press[5] (noun), a bodybuilding and weightlifting exercise in which a lifter lies on a bench with the feet on the floor and raises a weight with both arms.

9d   Sea creature // unadorned with pinch of salt (8)

Sodium chloride[5] (symbol NaCl) is the scientific name for common salt.

14d   Lack of progress // disturbed antagonist (10)

16d   Drool dodderingly about clergyman turning up /in/ wartime operation (8)

Operation Overlord[7] was the code name for the Battle of Normandy, the Allied operation that launched the successful invasion of German-occupied western Europe during World War II. The operation commenced on 6 June 1944 with the Normandy landings (Operation Neptune, commonly known as D-Day).

18d   Use ol' Mini that's clapped out? /Get/ much bigger car (9)

Clapped-out[5,10] (also clapped out[2,10]) is an informal British term meaning worn out from age or heavy use and unable to work or operate a clapped-out old van.

Scratching the Surface
Mini[7] is an automobile brand, currently owned by BMW, but originally introduced as a model under the Austin and Morris marques by the British Motor Corporation (BMC).

20d   Succeed /with/ a herb placed around top of escalope (7)

Scratching the Surface
An escalope[5] (also escallop)  is a thin slice of meat without any bone, typically a special cut of veal from the leg that is coated, fried, and served in a sauce.

21d   English parliamentarian in international // storm (7)

"parliamentarian" = MP (show explanation )

In Britain (as in Canada), a politician elected to the House of Commons is known as a Member of Parliament[10] (abbreviation MP[5]) or, informally, as a member[5].

hide explanation

International[5] is a British term for a game or contest between teams representing different countries in a sport ⇒ the Murrayfield rugby international.

 Test[5] (short for Test match)[5] denotes an international cricket or rugby match, typically one of a series, played between teams representing two different countries ⇒ the Test match between Pakistan and the West Indies.

23d   Flag /and/ fade away (5)

Peter[1] is another term for the Blue Peter[5], a blue flag with a white square in the centre, raised by a ship about to leave port.

25d   Weapon // pierces a breastplate to some extent (5)

26d   Turn // corner (4)

Turn and spot are synonyms in the following context (possibly among others):
  • A turn[5] is a short performance, especially one of a number given by different performers in succession ⇒ (i) Lewis gave her best ever comic turn; (ii) he was asked to do a turn at a children’s party
  • A spot[5] is a place for an individual item within a show she couldn't do her usual singing spot in the club.
Corner and spot are synonyms in the following context:
  • A corner[5] is a difficult or awkward situation I didn't wait for the prosecutor to try to get me in a corner.
  • A spot[5] (especially in the phrase 'in a spot') is a difficult situation.
Key to Reference Sources: 

[1]   - The Chambers Dictionary, 11th Edition
[2]   - Search Chambers - (Chambers 21st Century Dictionary)
[3]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (American Heritage Dictionary)
[4]   - TheFreeDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[5]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford Dictionary of English)
[6]   - Oxford Dictionaries (Oxford American Dictionary)
[7]   - Wikipedia
[8]   - Reverso Online Dictionary (Collins French-English Dictionary)
[9]   - Infoplease (Random House Unabridged Dictionary)
[10] - CollinsDictionary.com (Collins English Dictionary)
[11] - TheFreeDictionary.com (Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary)
[12] - CollinsDictionary.com (Webster’s New World College Dictionary)
[13] - MacmillanDictionary.com (Macmillan Dictionary)
Signing off for today — Falcon